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Project Update:

Short Segment of East Lake Sammamish Trail to open – Both fish-passable culverts have been installed on the Zackuse Creek. Trail restoration work continues at Zackuse and the trail will reopen once remaining safety features are installed. This work includes over 600 feet of sawn lumber fence. King County Parks is working with its primary contractor to complete this important work as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience during this important project. We expect to have the trail open by Saturday, March 9, 2019.  

In addition to the replacement of two obsolete culverts which restricted access to a mile of upstream spawning habitat, this project has restored the Zackuse Creek banks with over 250 native plants.  The Creek is now visible from the trail so stop and enjoy the view and perhaps witness a Kokanee salmon.

Project Descriptions:

Zackuse Creek Culvert Replacement - Replace two obsolete culverts, under the ELST and adjacent Shore Lane, impeding upstream salmon migration with fish passable culverts. The new box culverts are significantly wider and are a contiguous part of the Zackuse Creek bed, allowing unobstructed access to over a mile of upstream spawning habitat for the kokanee salmon and other fish species. King County Parks also restored the streambeds between culverts, and with the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe planted over 1000 new trees and shrubs on the creek banks and along over 700 linear feet of adjacent trail.  In partnership with King County Parks, the City of Sammamish replaced the East Lake Sammamish Parkway culvert with a fish passable culvert and restored 400 linear feet of Zackuse Creek and surrounding banks upstream of their culvert.

King County Parks expects to reopen this section of trail in early March.  Parks will install over 600 feet of new sawn-lumber fence to segregate the trail and adjacent wetlands, and additional landscaping after the trail is reopened. View project photos.

Shore Lane NE Culvert Replacement - Schedule C includes demolition and replacement of the existing 2-foot span by 3.5-foot rise box culvert under a private road, East Lake Sammamish Shore Lane NE (Shore Lane NE). This culvert will be replaced with a fish passable 12-foot plan by 5-foot rise by 14-foot long concrete box structure.

The work also includes associated temporary stream bypass, utility bypass and restoration, preparation and implementation of storm water pollution prevention plan, habitat enhancement plantings preparation, temporary traffic control, roadway restoration and other works, in accordance with the attached Plans, these Special Provisions, the Standard Specifications, the KCRDCS, and the APWA/WSDOT Standard Plans for Road, Bridge, and Municipal Construction.

In a coordinated effort with King County, the City of Sammamish will be installing a fish culvert on the East Lake Sammamish Parkway. For information on this project please visit the City of Sammamish project website.

See below for individual project plans. If you have additional question email ELST@kingcounty.gov


Construction Plan (May 2018):

Public Outreach:

Location: SE 33rd St to Inglewood Hill Rd. - approximately 3.6 miles

Project Description: Redevelopment of the final 3.6-mile trail segment between SE 33rd Street and Inglewood Hill Road will include a 12-foot-wide paved trail with soft surface shoulders, improved sightlines and safety features at intersections, improved drainage, and six new fish passable culverts. Trail construction also includes retaining walls, fencing, consistent signage and traffic control measures, wetland mitigation and native landscaping. To view project documents visit the South Sammamish B Segment Project Page.

Funding for this segment was provided by the voter-approved 2014-2019 Parks, Trails, and Open Space Replacement Levy.

Project Update: This segment is currently in the final design and permitting phase. Construction is anticipated to begin spring 2020.

Location: Located just north of Inglewood Hill Road, off of East Lake Sammamish Parkway

Redevelopment includes space for up to 27 vehicles, including ADA accessible spaces, a restroom facility, covered bicycle parking, and a pedestrian/bicycle ramp to access the trail. To view project documents visit the Inglewood Hill Parking Access and Restroom Facilities Project Page.

Funding for this segment is provided by the voter-approved 2014-2019 Parks, Trails, and Open Space Replacement Levy.

Project Update: The King County Parks Division has submitted an application for a Construction Permit to the City of Sammamish for the first phase of construction of the East Lake Sammamish Trail Inglewood Hill Road Parking Lot (Phase 1- Lower Wall and Trail Improvements). Phase 1 of the  project constructs approximately 480 feet of 18 foot wide trail and 425 feet of retaining wall supporting the new trail.  The project is located near the intersection of Inglewood Hill Road and East Lake Sammamish Parkway.  The Land Use Permit phase of the project has concluded and the King County Parks  Division was granted a Shoreline Substantial Development Permit by the City of Sammamish Hearing Examiner on February 5, 2018 allowing the project to proceed to the Construction Permit phase.

Location: Located on the north side of SE 33rd St., off of East Lake Sammamish Parkway. This parking lot will provide approximately 30 parking spaces and a restroom.

Project Update: This parking lot is currently holding at 30% design, awaiting availability of future funding.

Location: SE 43rd Way to SE 33rd St.- approximaely 1.2 miles

​Project Description: South Sammamish A is a 1.2-mile segment of the ELST between SE 43rd Way (Issaquah/Sammamish city limits) and SE 33rd Street in Sammamish. This trail segment features a 12-foot-wide paved surface with two-foot gravel shoulders on each side, providing the highest degree of accessibility to people of all ages and abilities. To view project documents visit the South Sammamish A Segment Project Page.

This newly developed trail segment includes the following features:

  • Eight new retaining walls to provide slope stability and reduce the trail footprint, resulting in less impact on environmentally sensitive areas and adjacent residents. 

  • Eight reconstructed intersections with improved sight lines and safety features like concrete warning bands, bollards, striping and consistent signage.  Warning bands provide a visual and textural difference from the paved trail’s surface and indicate an intersection is 75-feet ahead.

  • Three new rest stops for trail users to enjoy, including a beautiful plaza at 33rd Street surrounded by landscaping with an information kiosk, bike racks and benches.

  • Approximately 750 new native trees and approximately 11,500 shrubs providing erosion control, providing increased visual and aural screening of East Lake Sammamish Parkway, wildlife protection and habitat connectivity, and a continuous park like setting along the corridor.

  • Over 3100 linear feet of new chain link fence, installed for safety above steep slopes.

  • Over 2700 linear feet of split rail fence to protect and provide delineation between trail and critical natural areas.

  • 0.85 acres of wetland mitigation area restored to increase fish and wildlife habitat and improve biological diversity. Features like habitat logs and brush piles were installed, as were a variety of native plant species that create multiple vegetation strata as they mature.

  • Improved storm water conveyance systems on and across the trail to ensure they can accommodate a 25-year storm event.

Funding for this segment is provided by the voter-approved 2008-2013 Open Space and Trails Levy and voter-approved 2014-2019 Parks, Trails, and Open Space Replacement Levy.  Other funding included the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant and the state Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program.

Project Update: Construction on this segment is currently complete, and the trail is open for use. Trail construction began January 2017 and was completed on January 17, 2018.

Location: 187th Ave NE to Inglewood Hill Rd - 2.6 miles

Project Description: Redevelopment included improvements to the former railroad bank between 187th Ave NE to Inglewood Hill Road. The project included removal of the existing gravel trail and construction of approximately 2.6 miles of 12-foot-wide paved trail with gravel shoulders, concrete driveway crossings and construction of five fish passable culverts. Other items of work included erosion control, site preparation, grading, structural earth walls, soldier pile wall, fencing, stormwater conveyance system, signage, traffic control, trail amenity items, landscaping and wetland mitigation.

Funding for this segment was provided by the voter-approved 2008-2013 Open Space and Trails Levy, the voter-approved 20014-2019 Open Space and Trails Levy and grant funding provided by the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant and the state Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program.

Project Update: Redevelopment of the North Sammamish was completed and open to the public July 2015. Click here for a video of the new trail segment.

Construction of this segment included planting 1,150 trees and more than 11,000 shrubs. Construction also included construction of 20 concrete intersections with concrete warning bands, improved sight lines, bollards, striping and signage. Trail construction included the installation of five fish passable culverts which will improve water quality and enhance habitat for the Lake Sammamish Kokanee, a fish species of importance.

If you have questions, or want to request specific documents from this segment, contact our hotline: 1-888-668-4886 or email our project team at ELST@kingcounty.gov


Design:

Technical Reports:

Construction:

100% Construction Plan by Section (October 2013) - 

Location: SE 43rd Way to Gilman Blvd - 2.2 miles

Project Description: The East Lake Sammamish Trail's Issaquah Segment is a 1.2-mile segment between SE 43rd Way (Issaquah/Sammamish city limits) to Gilman Blvd in Issaquah. This trail segment features a 12-foot-wide paved surface with two-foot gravel shoulders on each side, providing the highest degree of accessibility to people of all ages and abilities. This newly developed trail segment includes the following features:

  • 24 new retaining walls to provide slope stability and reduce the trail footprint, resulting in less impact on environmentally sensitive areas and adjacent residents. 

  • 11 reconstructed intersections with improved sight lines and safety features like concrete warning bands, bollards, striping and consistent signage.  Warning bands provide a visual and textural difference from the paved trail’s surface and indicate an intersection is 75-feet ahead.

  • A new rest stop, surrounded by new landscaping, for trail users to enjoy the view of Lake Sammamish.

  • Approximately 830 new native trees and approximately 51,000 shrubs providing erosion control, providing increased visual and aural screening of East Lake Sammamish Parkway, wildlife protection and habitat connectivity, and a continuous park like setting along the corridor.
  • Over 3700 linear feet of new chain link fence, installed for safety above steep slopes.

  • Over 12,500 linear feet of split rail fence to protect and provide delineation between trail and critical natural areas.

  • Approximately two acres of wetlands restored by connecting the existing wetland areas 4A and 4BD. Restoration increases floodwater storage, retaining important sediments and nutrients, and improved biological diversity. Features like habitat logs and brush piles were installed, as were a variety of native plant species that create multiple vegetation strata as they mature.

Funding for this segment was provided by the voter-approved 2008-2013 Open Space and Trails Levy. Other funding included the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) program and the state Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program.

Project Update: This segment was completed June 2013. Click here to view photos of the East Lake Sammamish Trail construction and post-construction .

If you have questions, or want to request specific documents from this segment, contact our hotline: 1-888-668-4886 or email our project team at ELST@kingcounty.gov


Construction Plan (November 2011):

Location: NE 70th St to 187th Ave NE - 1.2 miles

Project Description: Redmond is a 1.2-mile segment of the ELST between NE 70th Street in Redmond and 187 Avenue NE (Redmond / Sammamish city limits) and includes a 77-stall parking lot located at NE 70th Street in Redmond. This trail segment features a 12-foot-wide paved surface with two-foot gravel shoulders on each side. , providing the highest degree of accessibility to people of all ages and abilities. This newly developed trail segment includes the following features:

  • 12 new retaining walls to provide slope stability and reduce the trail footprint, resulting in less impact on environmentally sensitive areas and adjacent residents. 

  • 4 reconstructed intersections with improved sight lines and safety features like concrete warning bands, bollards, striping and consistent signage.  Warning bands provide a visual and textural difference from the paved trail’s surface and indicate an intersection is 75-feet ahead.

  •  Two new rest stops for trail users to stop and enjoy a break.

  • Approximately 400 new native trees and approximately 2900 shrubs providing erosion control, providing increased visual and aural screening of East Lake Sammamish Parkway, wildlife protection and habitat connectivity, and a continuous park like setting along the corridor.

  • Over 4000 linear feet of new chain link fence, installed for safety above steep slopes.

  • Over 2500 linear feet of split rail fence to protect and provide delineation between trail and critical natural areas.

  • Restored approximately 0.85 acres of wetlands to improve Lake Sammamish water quality, increase fish and wildlife habitat, and improve biological diversity. Features like habitat logs and brush piles were installed, as were a variety of native plant species that create multiple vegetation strata as they mature.

  • Construction of a bio-retention facility in the parking lot to treat storm water.

Funding for the Redmond Segment of the East Lake Sammamish Trail Redevelopment Project is provided, in part, by the 2008-2013, voter-approved Proposition 2 Parks Expansion Levy.

Project Update: This 1.2-mile segment of the East Lake Sammamish Trail was completed and open to the public November 2011.

If you have questions, or want to request specific documents from this segment, contact our hotline: 1-888-668-4886 or email our project team at ELST@kingcounty.gov


Construction Plan (January 2011)

Trail Description

The East Lake Sammamish Trail (ELST) is an alternative non-motorized transportation corridor and multi-use recreational trail along 11 miles of former Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad corridor on the east side of Lake Sammamish, from Redmond to Issaquah. King County purchased the corridor in 1998 and opened an interim gravel trail in 2006. To date, King County Parks has spent more than a decade planning, designing, and constructing the master plan of the trail, continually coordinating with a citizen’s advisory group, and the cities of Redmond, Sammamish, and Issaquah.

Part of the “Locks to Lakes Corridor,” the ELST's 3.6-mile Segment B is currently the only "missing link" in a 44-mile long regional trail corridor that connects the Burke-Gilman Trail, the Sammamish River Trail, the Marymoor Connector Trail, and the Issaquah-Preston Trail, linking Seattle to the Eastside and the Cascade Foothills. The trail provides greater access to recreation, employment, and retail in the cities of Redmond, Sammamish, and Issaquah and provides a multi-use path for bicyclists, pedestrians, joggers, walkers, and movers of all ages and abilities. 

Why is King County developing the East Lake Sammamish Trail?

Part of the "Locks to Lakes Corridor" the 3.6-mile Segment B is currently the only remaining "missing link" in a  in a 44-mile-long regional trail corridor that connects the Burke-Gilman trail, the Sammamish River Trail, the Marymoor Connector Trail, and the Issaquah-Preston Trail, linking Seattle to the Eastside and the Cascade Foothills. This type of paved trail, with 12-feet of paved surface and 2-foot packed gravel shoulders, has the highest degree of accessibility to people of all ages and abilities. The trail offers a safe and scenic route along the eastern shore of Lake Sammamish, in a former railroad corridor, and serves as a recreational amenity and commuter path for bicyclists, pedestrians, joggers, and other outdoor enthusiasts now and for generations to come.


A trail for the community – Trail safety and accessibility are Parks primary goals. The new trail features a 12-foot wide asphalt surface with two-foot gravel shoulders and a one-foot clear zone on each side of the trail. The ELST project provides improved intersections, clear sight lines, consistent signage and improved drainage. Environmental improvements include enhancing wetlands, stabilizing slopes, installing fish passable culverts, and planting native landscaping. The redeveloped trail will benefit people of all ages and abilities – providing safe and healthy activities for families, individuals, and communities to enjoy.


Trail History

A trail 48 years in the making – The East Lake Sammamish rail corridor (ELSRC) has existed since 1889 when the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad connected its rail line from Seattle through what are now Woodinville and Redmond to reach coal mines in Gilman (now Issaquah). By the early twentieth century, rail access to the east shore of Lake Sammamish led to thriving lumber mills, settlements like Monohon and Inglewood, and resorts along its banks.  In time these early settlements and industries faded and were replaced with the dense residential development along the corridor today.  

The rail corridor changed ownership several times before Burlington National Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway, the final rail operator on the corridor, acquired it.  Eventually deciding to abandon the line, BNSF sold the corridor and all of the railroad’s property rights in the ELSRC to the Cascade Land Conservancy and King County in 1997.
  
King County, which first identified this rail section in 1971 as a critical future link in its Regional Trails System, petitioned the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB) to “railbank” the corridor. The 1983 Railbanking amendment to the 1968 National Trails System Act provides indefinite use of abandoned rail corridors for trails while preserving the right to restore the corridors for freight rail operations. The STB granted railbank status to the ELSRC in 1998, and the Cascade Land Conservancy conveyed its interest in the corridor to King County the same year. 

The King County Council unanimously adopted an ordinance and appropriated funds in 2000 for development of a soft surface trail on the railbanked ELSRC. King County Parks led a region-wide community engagement effort to guide development of the ESLT Master Plan.  After overcoming legal challenges, these efforts culminated in the completion of the East Lake Sammamish interim trail, opened to the public in 2006. The first permanent trail segment, Redmond, was completed in 2011.  The second, the Issaquah segment, was completed in 2013, and North Sammamish in 2015.  The remaining segment, South Sammamish, was split into two and the South Sammamish A Segment was completed in January 2018.   Construction on the final 3.6-mile segment, South Sammamish Segment B, will begin spring 2020.

East Lake Sammamish Trail reopens from King County DNRP on Vimeo.


 Want updated design or construction information?

Visit the "Project Information by Segment" section to view the latest design or construction plans, technical reports, public outreach, and more. We'll keep all our ELST neighbors and stakeholders up to date as design and construction progresses on this important Regional Trail.


 Want more information about our entire Regional Trail System?

We have over 300 miles of regional trails in King County. You can get to know this system, see trails near you, plan trips, walks, rides and more, by going to our TrailFinder application. TrailFinder can help you get to know the East Lake Sammamish Trail as well as others in your area. Start exploring your big backyard today!

 Be a part of the trails community!

The East Lake Sammamish Trail, much like all of our Regional Trails System trails, is a work in progress requiring constant management and upkeep. We always welcome constructive suggestion about trail maintenance, or safety from our users. Be sure to let us know if you see something on the trail that you think we can improve.

 New to the trail?

Visit the "Trail History" section to learn more about the history behind the trail. Have general questions? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions page.


1712_7033w_trailmap_ELST_segments2



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Hotline: 1-888-668-4886
Email: ELST@kingcounty.gov