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King County’s procedures for considering public safety when placing large wood in King County rivers requires that the Department of Natural Resources and Parks develop and maintain a list of projects where large wood will be or is likely to be installed in a King County river or stream. This project list will be updated every year and made available by request and via the county Website or e-mail notifications. For each project, the project manager will develop the following information for use in the public outreach process:

  • Brief project description, including approximate type and amounts of wood expected to be used;
  • Location of project;
  • Primary purpose of the project and its relative importance to the success of County programs and mandates;
  • Project goals and objectives;
  • Existing project site conditions;
  • Type, intensity and seasonality of recreational uses, if known;
  • Intended function of the wood, including identification of how wood meets project goals and objectives;
  • Project status and timing of conceptual design input opportunities; and
  • Timing of planned and completed project construction.
Project managers present information about upcoming projects in a public meeting held in the spring/summer of each year.

Projects in progress

Location: Duwamish River, right bank at River Mile 6.7, just upstream of the Tukwila International Blvd. bridge

Description: This project will create nearly 6-acres of off-channel aquatic, wetland and riparian habitat adjacent to the Duwamish River. Approximately 80,000 cubic yards of soil will be removed to create a hook-shaped backwater channel and surrounding marsh and riparian habitats.

Purpose and importance: This is a mitigation project, funded through King County’s in-lieu fee mitigation program, which will provide critically-needed off-channel rearing habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonid species. 

Goals and objectives: This project will fulfill mitigation requirements purchased through King County’s in-lieu fee mitigation program. The project will create 5.4 acres of wetland and aquatic habitat suitable for rearing of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonid species that use the Duwamish River.

Existing site conditions: The site is presently bare ground, but was until recently the site of a motel. The site is located at River Mile 6.7 on the Duwamish River, which is about one mile upstream of the turning basins and industrial shipping traffic. Only a small fraction of the original wetland habitats that existed in the Duwamish prior to European settlement remain and these habitats are vitally important to endangered Chinook salmon and other anadromous fish that use the Green/Duwamish River system.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: This reach of the Duwamish is not dredged and so not used by commercial boat traffic. However, it is used by both human powered- and motor-powered recreational boaters, mostly during the summer months. There is a kayak/canoe launching site just upstream at the Duwamish Gardens site and some riverside residents upstream also have boat launches. No data is available regarding intensity or frequency of recreational boat use of this reach of the Duwamish.

Intended large wood function: Large Wood will be used for several purposes on this site. First, wood will be placed and anchored around the high-water mark (El. 10’ NAVD 88) to mimic wood that is wracked at the high-tide line in estuarine systems. This wood provides habitat for terrestrial wildlife and for insects that are prey for salmon and trout. Other logs will be placed partially buried (and anchored) into the substrate to provide structure for placed topsoil and to minimize erosion. Finally, a bank protection structure will be constructed of mostly-buried logs with rootwads to protect a portion of the site that may be more susceptible to erosion. All logs will be securely anchored on site.

Project status:

Project manager: Laird O'Rollins

Anticipated construction: 2020

Location: Issaquah Creek near SE 156th Ave and Cedar Grove Road

Description: This project will fulfill in-lieu fee mitigation credit obligations for the Mitigation Reserves Program, which is providing compensatory mitigation for unavoidable wetland and aquatic area impacts associated with development in the Sammamish Service Area. By creating and enhancing wetlands, placing large wood and planting riparian areas, the project generally aims to protect and improve water quality, provide wetland and aquatic habitat, store floodwaters, and maintain water flow. Restoring these ecosystem services will improve the Middle Issaquah Creek Natural Area, benefit area residents, and support the Water and Land Resource Division’s mission and strategic plan.

Purpose and importance: Proposed large wood placement in this reach is intended to provide hydraulic complexity in the form of pools and backwaters, and provide structure and cover important for all life stages of salmonids. Large wood is underrepresented along Issaquah creek and is a necessary component to provide habitat as well as reinitiate and sustain habitat forming processes. It will also meet the need for mitigation of off-site impacts to aquatic habitat areas.

Goals and objectives: Placed logjams will include at least 138 pieces of large wood (70 racking logs and 68 structural logs). Large wood accumulations and logjams serve different purposes and have different designs depending on their location in the project site. As a result, each structure type has a different natural analogue and conceptual models. Logjams have been separated into mainstem jams at the upstream end of the site, backwater jams in the middle of the site, and a side channel jam at the downstream end of the site.

Existing site conditions: Aerial photos and site topography suggest that Issaquah Creek has migrated throughout the project site and occupied the central portion of the site as recently as the early 1900’s. Since that time, earthwork and revetments have straightened and confined the channel to the southern margin of the site, and disconnected wetlands, side channels and other off channel floodplain habitats. Clearing has removed much of the former forested riparian area.  Some large wood is present in the channel, notably in the bends at the upstream and downstream ends of the project site.  In some locations large wood is present and individual pieces and in others it forms small jams.  Most wood appears to be less than about 18 inches in diameter and 30 feet in length and it all appears to be mobile during floods under current conditions.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: No instream recreational use is known to occur in this part of Issaquah Creek. 

Intended large wood function: Proposed large wood placement in this reach is intended to provide hydraulic complexity in the form of pools and backwaters, and provide structure and cover important for all life stages of salmonids. Channel migration and tree recruitment are desired and expected outcomes from this project. Along with channel migration, we anticipate that the channel will become more sinuous, shallower and wider with rougher margins and improved floodplain connectivity. All of these factors will increase the likelihood of retaining large wood on the site.

Project status:

Project manager: Josh Latterell

Anticipated construction: 2019

Location: Judd Creek (tributary to Quartermaster Harbor on Vashon Island), RM 0 – 0.2

Description: Place 24 pieces of wood in the channel of Judd Creek to increase complexity and variety of habitat.

Purpose and importance: Estuaries and stream mouths on Puget Sound provide valuable habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids that cruise the shorelines.

Goals and objectives: Improve habitat in the Judd Creek Estuary for salmonids by adding large wood and widening the channel where a human-made landscaping pond borders the creek.

Existing site conditions: The existing channel is homogenous and devoid of wood or other cover.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Judd Creek is too small for floating, fishing or other forms of in-water recreation. The reach is isolated and difficult to reach.

Intended large wood function: To provide fish cover and cause changes to channel morphology that will improve fish habitat.

Project status:

Project manager: Laird O’Rollins

Anticipated construction: 2018

Lower Russell Levee Setback

Location: Green River, RM 17.85 - 19.25, right bank

Description: Replace an existing system of levees and revetments, construct a floodwall, and setback the levee from the river. The project will integrate existing road, trail and park amenities and enhance existing recreational opportunities.

Purpose and importance: The project provides flood protection benefiting the lower Green River valley and the communities of Kent, Tukwila and Renton.

Goals and objectives: Construct a flood protection system that balances policy directives regarding flood protection (e.g., flow containment, scour protection, stability, and vegetation maintenance), habitat restoration, and recreational use.

Existing site conditions: The existing, aging levee system was constructed in the early1960s and does not meet current engineering design standards.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use for floating, boating and fishing.

Intended large wood function: To provide fish cover and velocity refuge during high flows, and scour; provide native riparian vegetation, including trees, to reduce water temperature, stabilize streambanks, and create overhanging cover; and to recruit wood in the future.

Project status:

Project manager: Erik Peters

Anticipated construction: 2019


 

Location: Tolt River, RM 0.1, right bank

Description: Remove the remaining right bank Lower Tolt River levee and place large wood in the floodplain channel created as a result of levee removal and elsewhere in the floodplain.

Purpose and importance: The project will reconnect the Tolt River with its historic floodplain and improve habitat for fish and wildlife.

Levee removal will Goals and objectives: Reconnecting the lower river with its floodplain will improve habitat conditions within the river and floodplain area, especially habitat for salmonids such as Chinook, coho, pink and chum salmon and cutthroat, rainbow and steelhead trout. New, more complex habitats will form, as existing habitats within the floodplain area have a more direct connection to the river.

Existing site conditions: Naturally deposited large wood is found throughout the lower Tolt River and near the project site. Because the rock removal area is within the former levee footprint, it has no large woody vegetation or debris so placing wood is important and necessary for creating salmon habitat. 

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use for floating and boating.

Intended large wood function: To provide more complex habitat features for fish including cover, structure and slower flows.

Project status:

  • 60% design graphics
  • HPA obtained; expecting Shoreline Exemption in near future
  • Instream Project Design Checklist

Project manager: Cindy Young

Anticipated construction: 2018

Location: Boise Creek (tributary to the White River), RM 1.7 – 2

Description: Widen the Boise Creek channel, place wood, add gravel to create habitat for Chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and coho salmon.

Purpose and importance: Complex low velocity aquatic habitat provides essential rearing opportunities for juvenile salmon. 

Goals and objectives: Increase the channel complexity of Boise Creek to create lateral and margin rearing and refuge habitat for Chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and coho salmon.

Existing site conditions: The creek is channelized through an agricultural area with no lateral rearing habitat or large wood.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: There is no recreational use on Boise Creek.

Intended large wood function: Provide fish cover and cause changes to channel morphology that will improve fish habitat.

Project status: Construction

Project manager: Sarah McCarthy

Anticipated construction: Summer 2018

Location: Boise Creek near 268th Ave SE, south of Enumclaw

Description: Add an additional 61 logs in the channel of Boise Creek to improve fish habitat. 

Purpose and importance: Estuaries and stream mouths on Puget Sound provide valuable habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids that cruise the shorelines.

Goals and objectives: To place large wood in a quantity and arrangement that is consistent with regional guidelines for stream restoration projects (Fox and Bolton 2007). The objective is to place six ‘key pieces’ approximately with attached rootwads and 55 logs without rootwads in five logjams in close contact with the wetted channel. Jams will be stabilized by the key pieces and contact with existing wood clusters. Each jam will be constructed within the widened channel area created in 2013.

Existing site conditions: In 2013, King County implemented a habitat restoration project on the property to benefit juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead trout. The channel was widened and native riparian plants were planted. Large wood clusters were built 30-40 feet apart in the widened channel to encourage the development of scour pools and other diverse aquatic habitats, while simultaneously reducing streambank erosion in the reach. The project produced significant habitat improvements and juvenile salmonids have responded very favorably. However, additional habitat capacity may be achievable by adding more submerged and overhead cover. In 2013, King County assured co-managers and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that additional wood would be placed if certain conditions were met after construction. These conditions were intended to determine whether additional wood could be placed without interfering with project goals. Given that these commitments to co-managers were made in good faith and codified in the federal permit, and the required conditions have been met, King County intends to place additional wood at the project site. In doing so, King County will be helping to achieve salmon recovery goals in WRIA 10 and the White River basin.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Boise Creek is too small for floating, fishing or other forms of in-water recreation. The primary recreational use is for bird-watching, not instream uses.

Intended large wood function: To provide cover for juvenile salmon and trout so they can escape predation and survive floods.

Project status:

Project manager: Josh Latterell

Anticipated construction: 2018

Location: Snoqualmie River near cities of Snoqualmie and North Bend.

Description: Repair of 775 linear feet of eroded revetment material and installation of four large wood flow deflection structures. 

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against erosion to a revetment that reduces risk of flooding to Southeast Reinig Road, the City of Snoqualmie’s Canyon Springs water main, Puget Sound Energy power infrastructure, and private and public properties.

Goals and objectives: Address significant damage to the Reinig Road revetment by rebuilding the damaged section and installing a series of flow deflector structures; reduce channel migration and erosion risk to Southeast Reinig Road, the City of Snoqualmie’s Canyon Springs water main, Puget Sound Energy (PSE) power infrastructure, and private and public properties; conduct repair to minimize long-term maintenance needs and associated costs; provide aquatic and riparian habitat benefits to comply with regulatory requirements.  

Existing site conditions: Geomorphic change and ongoing erosion has caused the destruction of an approximately 775-foot long section of the revetment.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: This river reach experiences low use (fewer than 2%) of all floaters observed in the main stem. Moderate use of swimmers in side channels have been observed during summer low flows.

Intended large wood function: Primary function is to provide increased protection to Southeast Reinig Road, PSE powerlines, City of Snoqualmie’s water main and public and private properties by pushing the erosive hydraulic forces of the flood waters away from the bank. Additionally the wood structures have variability in their projection away from the bank reducing the likelihood that the river will become entrained against the revetment. Secondary functions are to increase structural complexity of riverine habitat, create scoured pools and areas of reduced flow velocity to benefit resident fish, and increase shading and refuge for wildlife and fish. 

Project status as of April 2019:

Project managers: Stella Torres and Craig Garric

Anticipated construction: Summer 2020

Riverbend Levee Setback and Floodplain Restoration Project 

Location: Cedar River, River Mile 6.5 - 7.5, left bank

Description: The project will reconnect approximately 52 acres of floodplain, enhance connection to existing off channel habitats and create over 5,000 linear feet of new side-channel habitat. 

Purpose and importance: The Cedar River is the highest priority sub-basin for Chinook salmon recovery in WRIA 8, and restoring off-channel habitat through property acquisition and floodplain reconnection as proposed is central to WRIA 8's Cedar River salmon recovery strategy. 

Goals and objectives:

  • Restore riverine processes and functions in the Cedar River and its floodplain in order to improve the quality, quantity, and sustainability of salmonid spawning and rearing habitat;
  • Reduce flood and erosion risks to people, property, and infrastructure;
  • Accommodate public use consistent with future ecological conditions at the site; and
  • Balance flood and ecological benefits and other objectives with project costs.

Existing site conditions: The river is confined by levees and revetments through the project reach with very little slow water habitat available for fish. Flood flows through this channelized reach inundate residential properties on the right bank and have the potential to erode flood facilities on the left bank, thereby posing risk to people and infrastructure.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: River recreation studies indicate that this reach of the Cedar River is among the most heavily used by recreational boaters, mostly during the summer.

Intended large wood function: Off-channel fish habitat, flow deflection and erosion protection.

Project status: Design

Project manager: Jon Hansen

Anticipated construction: 2019 - 2020

Website:  SE 19th Way Road Protection Revetment Repair Project

Location: Snoqualmie River, left bank, RM 31.55 downstream from Fall City.

Description: Repair 200 feet of damaged revetment and improve stability.

Purpose and importance: The damaged revetment, which provides protection to a County-owned road, is a high priority to repair

Goals and objectives: Stop bank erosion threatening SE 19th Way.

Existing site conditions: Previous revetment has eroded and river bank is receding toward SE 19th Way.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use for boats, floating and fishing. WDFW river access and parking located downstream of the project on the right bank.

Intended large wood function: No large wood will be incorporated into the revetment repair. Existing naturally occurring large wood will be removed for construction then placed back on or near the repaired revetment.

Project status as of May 2018: Design and permitting complete.

Project Manager: Jay Smith

Anticipated construction: Summer 2018

Location: North Fork Snoqualmie River near North Bend and Snoqualmie

Description: Construct a buried setback revetment comprised of large wood, slash, and rock landward of the damaged Shake Mill Left Bank Revetment.

Purpose and importance: Geomorphic change and ongoing erosion have caused the destruction of an approximately 400-foot long section of the 1700-foot long Shake Mill Left Bank/Tarp Revetment on the left bank of the North Fork Snoqualmie River. This damage to the Shake Mill Left Bank Revetment has increased channel migration and avulsion risks to 428th Ave SE, the North Fork Snoqualmie Bridge, and private property.

Goals and objectives: Reduce channel migration and avulsion risks to 428th Ave SE, the North Fork Snoqualmie Bridge, and private property, while providing aquatic and riparian habitat benefits to comply with regulatory requirements. 

Existing site conditions: A 400-foot section of existing rock revetment has eroded away, leading to rapid erosion of the unprotected bank.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Infrequent. 

Intended large wood function: Stabilize future streambank and provide aquatic and riparian habitat benefits to comply with regulatory requirements.

Project status:

Project manager: Gus Kays

Anticipated construction: Summer 2019

Location: Taylor Creek (tributary to Cedar River), Maple Valley, WA

Description: Place 130 logs, 15 conifer snags and 225 cubic yards of slash in created wetlands and uplands of Taylor Creek to increase complexity and value of habitat.

Purpose and importance: Taylor Creek and associated wetlands provide valuable habitat for juvenile salmon.

Goals and objectives: Improve salmonid habitat in Taylor Creek and the Cedar River watershed by creating and enhancing diverse wetland communities and adding large wood and other habitat features.

Existing site conditions: The existing project site is old floodplain and wetlands that have been filled and or otherwise disturbed.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Taylor Creek is too small for floating or other forms of in-water recreation.

Intended large wood function: To provide fish cover and improve habitat for fish and wildlife.

Project status:

Project manager: Dan Eastman

Anticipated construction: spring/summer 2019

Teufel Nursery - Green River Corridor Mitigation Site

Location: Green River, Left Bank, RM 19.9-20.8

Description: 85 logs will be placed at the site along with the planting of 1,046 native plants within 150 feet of the Green River.

Purpose and importance: The project is required mitigation for previously completed work to clear trees and vegetation along Green River levees in the City of Kent to maintain USACE PL-8499 eligibility in 2009.

Goals and objectives: Mitigate for impacts due to tree cutting on lower Green River levees in 2009; interact with sediments and river flows to moderate channel migration rates and channel geometry; provide cover and refuge locally for adult and juvenile salmonids.

Existing site conditions: Large site previously occupied by plant nursery.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low to moderate use for floating, boating and fishing.

Intended large wood function: To restore ecological functions associated with wood being located in the floodplain. Design is underway.

Project status as of November 2017:

Project manager: Jennifer Rice

Anticipated construction: Summer 2018

Tolt Pipeline Protection Project 

Location: Snoqualmie River near Duvall.

Description: Reconstruction of failing lower end of the Winkleman Revetment.

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against river hazard.

Goals and objectives: Stop bank erosion threatening the City of Seattle Tolt River Water Supply pipeline in a manner consistent with Flood Hazard Management Plan goals and objectives.

Existing site conditions: Previous revetment has eroded and river bank is receding toward pipeline.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use is very low.

Intended large wood function: Stabilize bank and improve ecological conditions.

Project status as of June 2018:

Project manager: Craig Garric

Anticipated construction: Summer 2018

Location: Left bank of the Green River between river mile 15.37 and river mile 16.03.

Description: The project is in cooperation with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The USACE will manage the design and construction of the new facility through the PL84-99 rehabilitation program. As identified in the Interim Green River System Wide Improvement Framework (SWIF), the existing system of levees in this reach do not meet current engineering design standards. The levee slopes are over-steepened and the system is prone to scour and slope instability, leaving the lower Green River valley at a higher flood risk than desired. 

Purpose and importance: The project provides flood protection benefiting the lower Green River valley and the community of Tukwila.

Goals and objectives: Increase the level of flood flow containment along the left bank. Assiste the USACE in selection of a flood protection system alternative for final design and construction that balances King County Flood Control District policy directives regarding flood protection, habitat restoration, and recreational use as informed by the SWIF, as well as project site opportunities, constraints, and funding. Incorporate habitat features including wood design and riparian vegetation necessary for permit approval.

Existing site conditions: The project shoreline includes the Green River Levee, the Segale Business Park, and other industrial areas with impervious surface areas. The tree cover in the project area is sparse, and existing non-native vegetation provides little cover for fish.

 

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use of this reach is low, according to the County's Synthesis of 2013 River Recration Studies (p. 31). Compared to the other two sections of the Green River studied, the lower Green River through this reach had much lower numbers of people per day, the highest life vest usage, and the highest use of boats (canoes and kayaks) rather than rafts and inner tubes.

Intended large wood functions: To restore ecological functions associated with wood being located in the floodplain.

Project status as of June 2018:

Project manager: Claire Jonson

Anticipated construction: Summer 2019

Projects completed

Mitigation for hazard log repositioning, May 2014

Location: Snoqualmie River downstream of Fall City.

Description: Place two logs on Aldair Levee.

Purpose and importance: The King County River and Floodplain Management Section cut and repositioned large wood at approximately River Mile 36 in response to a report from the sheriff’s office (dated May 14, 2014). RFMS obtained a permit from the Washington State Dept. of Fish and Wildlife to do the work that requires large wood placement elsewhere as mitigation.

Goals and objectives: The project objective is to meet a permit requirement for the hazard wood alteration upstream.

Existing site conditions: The site and reach have been constrained by levees on both banks. The site where King County plans to place the two logs is on the Aldair Levee, across the river from the Upper Carlson project, where river widening and channel migration is expected to occur in the coming years.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: River recreation studies indicate most people using the river for recreation take out at Fall City. The level of recreational use in the project area is low. During a pilot study, an average of 220 to 302 people recreated on the river upstream of Fall City compared to an average of seven per day downstream.

Intended large wood function: Fish habitat.

Project Status:

Project manager: Phyllis Meyers

Project completed: 2015

Location: Bear Creek-Doyle, RM 3.25

Description: Place large woody debris in the channel to enhance habitat and excavate side channels to provide off-channel habitat.

Purpose and importance: Project will enhance habitat quality for juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonid species, including off-channel habitat.

Goals and objectives: To enhance rearing habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonid species.

Existing site conditions: The existing channel is overly-simple and lacks cover, complex habitat and off-channel habitat.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Bear Creek is too small for recreational floating, but the riparian areas are used for passive recreation (fish and wildlife viewing, etc.).

Intended large wood function: To provide fish cover and velocity refuge during high flows, and scour; to provoke changes to the channel geometry that will provide better habitat conditions.

Project status:

Project manager: Laird O’Rollins

Anticipated construction: Summer 2017

Project name: Belmondo Revetment Enhancement Project

Location: Cedar River RM 9.5-10.8

Description: Reconstructed 370 linear feet of an eroding revetment facility with vegetated geogrids, two engineered log jams and two boulder clusters.

Purpose and importance: The project enhanced and extended an existing bank protection facility that protects s regional trail, data cable, and state highway.

Goals and objectives: To continue and complete the bank stabilization and flood control that was initiated with the emergency repair performed in January 2009.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The trail has moderate year-round use by bicyclists. The river has moderate seasonal use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: The large wood and habitat structures will increase the quantity and quality of aquatic and riparian habitat and provide mitigation for impacts to aquatic habitat associated with the Cedar Rapids project.

Project manager: Mason Bowles

Completed: 2013

Cedar Rapids Levee Setback Repair Project

Location: Cedar River, RM 7.45, Right Bank

Description: Repair an existing engineered log jam (ELJ) that protects against channel migration. Construction activities include restoring the ELJ to the as-constructed condition by replacing the light, loose riprap and alluvium that were lost from within the ELJ matrix after the 2010 construction. Willow stakes will be installed where fill material is replaced. Bumper logs will be added to the upstream face of the ELJ to reduce hazards to recreationalists.

Purpose and importance: The primary purpose is to repair the existing ELJ to as-constructed condition. Currently, a large portion of the ELJ is porous due to the loss of ballast material from within the ELJ matrix. This condition allows for flow through the ELJ, creating trapping risks to recreationalists. The inclusion of bumper logs on the upstream face of the ELJ will also address these risks.

Goals and objectives: Reconstruct the ELJ to the 2010 as-constructed condition and include permittable features that were not part of the original design, such as bumper logs on the upstream face of the ELJ, to further ensure recreational safety.

Existing site conditions: In 2010, 12 ELJ structures were constructed in the Cedar Rapids reach of the Cedar River to satisfy several project goals, one of which was to discourage migration of the mainstem channel towards setback levees. The ELJs were designed to function as non-porous structures, and although originally constructed 20 to 50 feet landward of the channel bank at the time, the 12 ELJ structures were designed to ultimately fully engage with the river channel. However, soon after the 2010 construction, unusual hydrologic conditions caused the river to flow immediately adjacent to one of the ELJs (ELJ 6), resulting in the loss of fill material and creating porous conditions.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The project is located in a reach that had the second highest rate of recreational boater use according to a 2010 study by King County. The reach with the highest rate of use is immediately downstream of the project. During the 2010 observation period for the study, more than 2,000 floaters passed through the reach between the Union 76 Station on Maple Valley Highway and Carco Park in Renton, with almost 400 on the busiest day. Recreational use on the Cedar River is highest between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

Intended large wood function: The bumper logs will principally have a hydraulic function. The bumper logs will reduce risks to recreational boaters that result from the way flows sweep along the upstream face of ELJ 6. The bumper logs will create a relatively smooth and continuous facing on the ELJ, preventing recreational users from getting snared by the ELJ. The placed wood meets the repair project's objectives of reducing risks to recreational boaters.

Project status: Design and permitting complete (July 2017)

Project manager: Jay Smith

Completed: 2017

Project name: Cedar Rapids Repair

Location: Cedar River RM 7.3-7.8

Description: Repaired/reconstructed a stable setback levee; modified the emergency repair work done to comply with permit requirements; and managed natural large wood recruited to site during flood.

Purpose and importance: To provide ongoing flood protection to homes and infrastructure located outside the project area, comply with permit requirements, and address public safety needs.

Goals and objectives: Eighty linear feet of emergency repair constructed in January 2011.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Moderate use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Project manager: John Engel

Completed: 2011

Project name: Cedar River Trail Site 2B

Location: Cedar River RM 6.5 Left Bank

Description: Reconstructed 100 linear feet of the eroded facility with rock, vegetated geogrids and six pieces of large wood.

Purpose and importance: The project maintains an existing bank protection facility that protects Cedar River Trail and Highway 169.

Goals and objectives: The project goal was to repair damage to the facility and provide mitigation for the site disturbance.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Moderate use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Create bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Kate Akyuz

Completed: 2010

Clough Creek Off-Channel Sediment Facility

Location: The project is located near North Bend at the intersection of 415th Way Southeast and Southeast 142nd Street.

Description: The project included the purchase and demolition of a home; creation of a sediment facility on the site; and stabilization of the stream bank using wood, rock and native plantings.

Purpose and importance: The purpose of the project was to create a sediment facility next to the stream and to collect excessive sediment and reduce downstream flooding. Flooding, erosion and sediment deposition impacts roads, residences and utilities.

Goals and objectives: The main goal of the project was to reduce the amount of excessive sediment in the stream to reduce overbank flood events which have damaged homes, yards, buildings, roads, and utility infrastructure. The project also removed residents from a potentially dangerous location and improved the aquatic environment.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use of the project area is for passive recreation. In the stream reach, Clough Creek is wadeable but does not have sufficient flow for boating.

Intended large wood function: The wood placements are designed to protect the streambank from erosion and mimic what was naturally and historically more common on streams. Woody debris provides structure, cover and hydraulic complexity in streams and provides structure, cover and substrate for aquatic organisms.

Project manager: Wendy Kara

Countyline Levee Setback

Location: White River, RM 5.0-6.3, Left Bank

Description: Remove 4,100 linear feet of existing levee and rock revetment. Construct 5,780 linear feet of engineered log biorevetment, four bank deflector engineered logjams, and one apex engineered logjam along the eastern edge of the existing wetland. Construct three apex engineered logjams in the northern portion of the wetland. Construct 6,000 linear feet of setback levee behind the biorevetment (from the A Street/BNSF bridges to the 8th Street/Stewart Road bridge).

Purpose and importance: The project accomplishes objectives of the adopted 2006 King County Flood Hazard Management Plan, including reducing risk to public safety and damage to public infrastructure and private structures. The project meets the goals of the Salmon Habitat Protection and Restoration Strategy for the Puyallup and Chambers/Clover Creek Watersheds.

Goals and objectives: Reduce existing flood hazards by increasing flood conveyance and storage capacity in the adjacent floodplain; restore riverine processes and functions within the project area to enhance salmonid rearing habitat, in particular spring and fall Chinook, coho, and steelhead; and design and construct a project that best meets these goals by using the most cost-effective means available.

Existing site conditions: The project site is located on the alluvial fan of the lower White River in the vicinity of the cities of Pacific and Sumner. Levees and revetments constructed as early as 1914 have disconnected the river from the adjacent floodplain and concentrated sediment deposition within the active channel, thereby reducing conveyance and increasing flood hazards.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: River recreational use in the project reach is limited due to high turbidity/ limited visibility, and cold temperatures. Recreational use includes kayaking, fishing, boating, and occasional rafting. Active recreation at City of Pacific Park includes river access, fishing, and wading. The existing left bank levee is used for passive recreational walking and hiking.

Intended large wood function: The primary functions of the wood installations will be to protect adjacent properties while improving fish habitat. The biorevetment will prevent bank erosion beyond the existing wetland edge. The bank engineered logjams will be integrated into the biorevetment and will function to deflect flows away from the setback levee. The three engineered logjams at the north end of the wetland will deflect and split flow coming into the project site.

Project Status: Permitting is complete.

Project manager: Chris Brummer

Completed: 2017

Elliott Bridge Reach Off-Channel Habitat and Floodplain Reconnection Project Phase 2

Location: Cedar River at River Miles 5.2 to 5.6, just downstream of the 154th Place Southeast Bridge, on the north bank.

Description: Construction of an engineered log jam on the margin of the mainstem channel to create a scour pool and instream cover for adult salmon.

Purpose and importance: To provide habitat benefits to salmon as mitigation for impacts from construction of the SR 520 Bridge Replacement Project.

Goals and objectives:

  • Construct an engineered log jam in the mainstem Cedar River to create a scour pool and satisfy mitigation obligations transferred to King County from the WSDOT SR 520 project (external link).
  • Address potential impacts to recreational safety.
  • Maintain current level of flood hazard protection to adjacent properties.
  • Implement a project that is compatible with future reach-wide habitat and flood hazard reduction projects.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: River recreation studies indicate that this reach of the Cedar River is among the most heavily used by recreational boaters, mostly during the summer.

Intended large wood function: Fish habitat.

Project manager: Jon Hansen

Completed: 2016

Project name: Fenster 2B Revetment Setback

Location: Left bank of the Green River at RM 31.8 within the City of Auburn.

Description: Removed approximately 500 linear feet of rock bank armoring from the left bank of the Green River and constructed a 900 foot long buried setback revetment; installed three buried wood structures in the floodplain between the buried setback revetment and the present river bank; and another along the downstream end of he buried setback revetment. Both large cottonwood trees and shorter conifer logs were used in the buried log structures. No wood was placed directly in the channel of the Green River.

Purpose and importance: The project allows natural river processes to form more complex habitat for recovering salmon populations while protecting neighboring properties from river migration.

Goals and objectives: Restore habitat forming processes and improve flood conveyance of the local reach by widening the channel cross-section; slow floodwater velocities, thereby reducing erosion, and increasing refuge from flooding for juvenile salmonids.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The reach is used by recreational tubers, floaters and fishermen. Most floating activities occur during the summer months, while fishing occurs mostly in the autumn months.

Intended large wood function: The buried wood structures will provide habitat benefits by increasing the complexity and quality of bank and instream fish habitat as the bank retreats.

Project manager: Laird O’Rollins

Completed: 2014

Project name: Fenster Log Placement Mitigation site at the Green River Natural Area

Location: Green River Natural Area Open Space at River Mile 38.0 on the Green River

Description: Seventy-nine coniferous logs with rootwads were placed into an approximately 360 foot long reach of an aquatic side-channel of the Green River. This project location was chosen after extensive design and modeling of instream wood placement alternatives at the original project site (Fenster Park in Auburn at RM 31.9 on the left bank of the Green River) illustrated unacceptable safety risks to recreational river users that could not be overcome by project design changes at that location.

Purpose and importance: The 79 pieces of large wood placed in this location fulfill several permitting requirements.

  1. Thirty-one pieces were original mitigation requirements due to trees cut on the riverward side of the Dykstra Levee in Auburn as part of vegetation maintenance requirements of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for levees enrolled in the PL-8499 program in 2009;
  2. Sixteen are additional pieces required by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for placing the wood in the Middle Green River instead of the Lower Green River where the trees were cut; and
  3. Thirty-one pieces of wood replace part of the 59 pieces removed at the Fenster 2A project site in Auburn, which was removed because bank retreat had stranded wood mid-channel thereby creating a hazard to recreational river users.
Goals and objectives: Project goals were to fulfill permit-related instream log placement mitigation requirements. The logs will also locally provide cover and refuge for adult and juvenile salmonids.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The side channel is not used by the recreational boating or swimming community. It is occasionally used for fishing. The project is not expected to negatively impact recreational river users.

Intended large wood function: To restore ecological functions associated with wood being located in the floodplain.

Contact: Fatin Kara

Completed: 2015

Project name: Fenster Log Placement Mitigation site at Fenster Park

Location: Fenster Park Green River, left bank, RM 31.9-32.0

Description: Twenty-eight pieces of large wood were placed in the floodplain, outside the active river channel.

Purpose and importance: The project included 28 pieces of wood that were removed at the Fenster 2A project site because the bank retreat had stranded wood mid-channel, thereby creating a hazard to recreational river users.
 
Goals and objectives: To satisfy permit requirements established as a condition of approval for removal of the instream logs.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational river users should not be impacted by the placement of wood in this location.

Intended large wood function: To restore ecological functions associated with wood being located in the floodplain.

Contact: Fatin Kara

Completed: 2015

Project name: Foster Golf Course Instream Log Placement Mitigation Site

Location: Duwamish River, right bank, RM 10.25-10.3

Description: Thirteen logs were secured to wooden pilings driven along an eroded portion of the riverbank at the Tukwila Foster Golf Course.

Purpose and importance: The project was required mitigation for previously completed levee clearing of trees and other vegetation. It also supplements an existing habitat restoration and levee setback project constructed a short distance downstream in 2008.
 
Goals and objectives: To mitigate for impacts due to tree cutting on the lower Green River levees in 2009; to interact with sediments and river flows to moderate channel migration rates and channel geometry; and to provide cover and refuge for adult and juvenile salmonids.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Extremely low recreational use; occasional canoeing or fishing; and constant golf play present upslope.

Intended large wood function: To restore ecological functions associated with wood being located in the floodplain.

Contact: Fatin Kara

Completed: 2015

Project name: Harris Creek Fish Passage Restoration

Location Harris Creek at the outfall of the Northeast Stossel Creek Way culvert and Northeast 138th Place

Description: A fishway located in Harris Creek was deteriorating and a barrier to upstream fish passage. The project removed the 25-foot long fish passage barrier at the downstream end of the Northeast Stossel Creek Way culvert and installed a 90-foot long roughened channel of well-graded bed mixture and logs.

Purpose and importance: The Harris Creek fish passage barrier was prioritized in an assessment of fish barriers within the Snoqualmie watershed that was conducted by Wild Fish Conservancy.

Goals and objectives: The goal of the project was to provide unimpeded fish passage to more than four miles of upstream habitat in Harris Creek and its tributaries.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The project is on private property and there are no adjacent trails or other passive recreation uses/features nearby. The adjacent land use is rural residential properties and open space parcels. The creek, especially during the typical recreational season, has only small flows. No recreational uses are known at this site.

Intended large wood function: The purpose of the project was to provide fish passage in a self-sustaining channel and restore natural processes.

Project manager: Carolyn Butchart

Completed: 2015

Project name: Herzman Levee Repair

Location: Cedar River RM 6.6 right bank

Description: Reconstructed 270 linear feet of the eroded facility with rock, vegetated geogrids, and six pieces of large wood.

Purpose and importance: To maintain an existing bank protection facility.

Goals and objectives: To repair damage to the facility and provide mitigation for the site disturbance.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Moderate use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Wes Kameda

Completed: 2010

Project name: Klapp Property Habitat Restoration Project

Location At the confluence of Mackey and Bear Creeks, near Northeast 106th Street and Avondale Road Northeast.

Description: Removed bank armoring from Mackey Creek and re-graded the channel banks. Connect Mackey Creek with adjacent wetland and place woody debris in Mackey Creek and adjacent wetland to improve habitat.

Purpose and importance: Improvement of salmon habitat, including Chinook salmon rearing habitat, in the Bear Creek Basin is a high priority of the WRIA 8 Salmon Recovery Plan.

Goals and objectives: Remove placed bank armor; regrade channel banks to form a compound channel; connect an adjacent wetland to the stream system; provide salmon rearing habitat off of the Bear Creek channel; and revegetate the site with native plant species.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use is very low. Neither Bear Creek nor Mackey Creek convey sufficient flows for instream recreation.

Intended large wood function: Improve instream habitat complexity and provide channel roughness.

Project manager: Laird O'Rollins

Completed: 2015

Project name: Long Marsh Creek Drainage Improvement

Location: Long Marsh Creek at May Creek confluence.

Description: Sediment removal from channel.

Purpose and importance: Improve flow capacity of stream channel and reduce inundation of surrounding properties.

Goals and objectives: Woody debris and native plants were installed in and around Long Marsh Creek, helping to restore instream habitat.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: No use by floaters, boaters, or fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Wes Kameda

Completed: 2014

Project name: May Creek Drainage Improvement

Location: May Creek at 148th Avenue Southeast

Description: Sediment removed from the channel.

Purpose and importance: Improve flow capacity of stream channel and reduce inundation of surrounding properties.

Goals and objectives: Woody debris and native plants were installed around May Creek, helping to restore habitat.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: No use by floaters, boaters, or fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Wes Kameda

Completed: 2014

Project name: McElhoe Pearson Restoration Project

Location: Snoqualmie River, Right Bank, RM 23.1-23.3

Description: Levee breach and channel excavation with setback flood protection. Nine pieces of large wood were placed in backwater area. A dozen or more small trees were placed in floodplain.

Purpose and importance: This project will enhance rearing and refuge habitat for endangered Chinook in the Snoqualmie River and reduce flood facility maintenance requirements.

Goals and objectives: Restore floodplain connectivity by breaching the confining levee.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Moderate use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Large wood in the backwater channel provides habitat value and meets the Washington State Department of Transportation mitigation need. Placing felled trees in floodplain provide habitat value and reduces hauling cost.

Project manager: Fauna Nopp

Completed: 2012

Location: Raging River near Fall City.

Description: Repair of 150 linear feet of eroded levee material.

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against erosion to Dike Road and provide continued access to the Fall City boat launch.

Goals and objectives: Repair the erosion damage by replacing missing face and toe rock. Specific objectives include: identify and evaluate alternatives for repair of damaged facility, design and permit the selected alternative, and construct the selected alternative in summer 2018.

Existing site conditions: Previous levee segment has eroded and river bank is receding toward Dike Road.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use by kayaks, canoes (spring through fall), medium use by swimmers (summer), and high use by tubers and floaters (summer).

Intended large wood function: The repair project goals do not include wood placement. It is a requirement in order to receive necessary environmental permits. The wood that will be placed as permit conditions is not expected to change the background wood loading in the system.

Project manager: Stella Torres

Completed: 2018

Porter Reach Restoration Project

Location: Middle Green River, River Mile 34, left bank

Description: The Porter Levee Setback project will remove approximately 800 lineal feet of existing training levee, and constructs, 1,000-foot backwater channel, one large wood deflector jam, six floodplain jams, 500 feet of bank roughening structures, and 900 feet of new levee along an elevated Green Valley Road.

Purpose and importance: Project is a prioritized action to implement the WRIA 9 Salmon Recovery Plan recommendations for the Middle Green River. This reach was also identified as a priority in the MGR Blueprint, the Ecosystem Restoration Plan, and the 2012 Middle Green River feasibility study. The expected outcome is restored salmon habitat.

Goals and objectives: To restore habitat-forming processes in the river floodplain that will improve rearing habitat for fall Green River Chinook salmon. The project will also improve flood control features and prevent river migration into neighboring properties.

Existing site conditions: The Porter Levee is a training levee. Its primary function is to confine the river to its current location. Floodplain landward of the levee is mixture of deciduous forest, open reed canarygrass field and two historic side channels.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: A variety of recreational users and crafts year-around, but with more intensive use upstream of project location and during warm summer days. WDFW access and parking located downstream of project on left bank.

Intended large wood function: Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project Status:

Project manager: Fauna Nopp

Anticipated construction: Summer 2017

Project name: Rainbow Bend Levee Removal and Floodplain Reconnection

Location: Cedar River RM 11.2 and 11.5

Description: King County and Seattle acquired frequently flooded properties, removed existing homes and related improvements and plans to remove approximately 900 feet of levee and revetment. The project also included grading to reconnect historic side channels and/or encourage side channel formation, the addition of floodplain roughness (large woody debris clusters), and planting native vegetation to restore a more natural floodplain community.

Purpose and importance: The project is identified in the Flood Hazard Reduction Plan to reduce flood hazards and long-term maintenance via buyouts and levee removal. The WRIA 8 Chinook Salmon Conservation Plan also identifies the project as an important component to salmon recovery in the Cedar River.

Goals and objectives: To restore river processes that create sustainable off channel rearing and refuge habitat for Chinook and other salmonid species; restore floodplain connectivity, increasing habitat complexity and hydraulic diversity; maximize habitat availability across the range of flow levels while minimizing the potential for fish stranding; provide overall flood relief to reach - lower elevations and velocities; and eliminate the need for long term facility maintenance and emergency response.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: This reach of the river had an estimated 250-500 floaters in 2010 based on data collected for the Cedar River Recreational Study.

Intended large wood function: Large wood was used within the floodplain to increase roughness and limit the potential for broad, shallow sheet flow across the site. No wood was placed within the river's mainstem.

Project manager:  Jon Hansen

Completed: 2013

Project name: Reddington Levee Setback and Extension Project

Location: Green River, RM 28.2 - 29.5, left bank

Description: Removed 4,800 feet of existing levee along the riverbank and constructed a 6,600 feet levee setback from the river.

Purpose and importance: To provide flood protection benefiting property valued at $680M (2009 assessed values).

Goals and objectives: To improve flood protection for Auburn and the Green River valley and riparian processes and functions for listed endangered species.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use by floaters, boaters and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Large wood will provide levee toe scour protection and river edge roughening for riparian habitat.

Project manager: Erik Peters

Completed: 2013

Location: Tolt River near Carnation.

Description: Repair of 70 linear feet of eroded revetment material.

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against erosion to Remlinger Farm and undeveloped agricultural property.

Goals and objectives: Repair the erosion damage by replacing missing face rock. Specific objectives include: identify and evaluate alternatives for repair of damaged facility, design and permit the selected alternative, and construct the selected alternative in summer 2018.

Existing site conditions: Previous revetment face rock has eroded.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: High use by anglers (late summer/fall), low use by kayaks/canoes (spring through fall), and medium use by tubers and floaters (summer).

Intended large wood function: The repair project goals do not include wood placement. It is a requirement in order to receive necessary environmental permits. The wood that will be placed as permit conditions is not expected to change the background wood loading in the system.

Project status as of June 2018:

Project manager: Stella Torres

Anticipated construction: Summer 2018

Project Name: Sammamish River Bank Repairs

Location: Sammamish River, RM 4.7 – 4.9, Right Bank  

Description: Two locations along the right bank of the Sammamish River (RM 4.7-4.9) in Bothell, upstream of the I-405 overpass have been identified as over-steepened and is threatening the integrity of the adjacent Sammamish River Trail. The Sammamish River is a US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facility (Sammamish River Flood Control Facility). The King County River and Floodplain Management Section is responsible to USACE for the maintenance of the facility, and supports King County Parks in protection of regional trail systems.

Both sites will involve bank reshaping and installation of native woody vegetation plantings to establish a stable slope condition. In addition, the east site will also include the use of large woody material for bank and toe protection.  The Project will require local realignment of the existing Sammamish River Trail at both sites. The Washington State Department of Transportation maintenance facility underneath I-405 is adjacent to the project area, and will be used to provide access to the site for all construction equipment.      

Purpose and importance: This primary objective of this project is to provide stabilization of the bank in the locations of identified failure. This project is necessary to limit the potential for further failure of the bank and possible failure of the Sammamish River Trail; the project will provide a greater level of safety for trail users. In addition, the project will provide maintenance to the Sammamish River Flood Control Facility. Recent further damage to the banks in both project site locations has bolstered the importance of this project to repair the federal facility and support in protection of the regional trail system.        

Goals and Objectives: The objectives of the project consist of the re-stabilization of two sections of the right bank of the Sammamish River, provide habitat enhancement for project permit required mitigation, develop a streamlined design alternative that can work within existing programmatic permits, serve as a model for future small bank repair projects along the Sammamish River, prevent any hydraulic impact on the conveyance capacity of the channel, and develop a design consistent with Sammamish River Corridor Plan and WRIA 8 Salmon Recovery Plan.    

Existing site conditions: Existing levee system has eroded and river bank is receding towards Sammamish River Trail.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low use for watercraft (canoes and kayaks) and fishing.

Intended large wood function: The east site is situated along a bend in the river, and is thus more likely to experience toe erosion.  The intended function of Large Wood at this project site will be to provide protection for the bank against toe erosion.

Project manager: Dan Heckendorf

Completed: 2019


Scott Property, Judd Creek Habitat Enhancement Small Habitat Restoration Project

Location: The project is located on Vashon Island at 10375 SW 225th Street and at the mouth of Judd Creek in Quartermaster Harbor.

Description: The project has both stream and estuary components. The project will enhance 550 feet of Judd Creek and 400 feet of shoreline in the Judd creek estuary by placing large and small wood debris.

Purpose and importance: The purpose of the project is to restore natural habitat forming processes and enhance habitat conditions for Chinook, Coho and chum salmon, forage fish, aquatic and marine organisms by placing woody debris. The restoration of the mouth of Judd Creek is a priority recommendation by the WRIA 9 technical committee, and restoration of this parcel is part of action NS 17 in the WRIA 9 Salmon Habitat Plan. 

Goals and objectives: Restore natural habitat forming processes by placing large and small woody debris into Judd creek and the Judd Creek estuary. Promote long term stewardship of Judd creek and the Judd Creek estuary by coordinating with stakeholders. Avoid and minimize impacts to cultural resources.

Existing site conditions: The property is owned and managed by the Vashon Maury Island Land trust for Open Space. King County holds a conservation easement on the property. The previous property owners maintains a lease on the property. The Tide Lands in the estuary are privately owned. 

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use of the project area is for passive recreation. In the steam reach, Judd Creek is wadable but does not have sufficient flow for boating. In the estuary, recreation is limited to small boats with minimal draft, and then only at high tide. The wood placements will not exclude recreational use of the estuary.

Intended large wood function: The wood placements are designed to mimic what was naturally and historically more common on Puget Sound shores and streams. Woody debris provides structure, cover and hydraulic complexity in streams and provides structure, cover and substrate for marine organisms and spawning forage fish that are an important and limited resource for Chinook salmon.

Project status: Design and permitting complete.

Project manager: Paul Adler

Anticipated construction: Summer 2016

Location: Snoqualmie River near North Bend.

Description: Repair of 100 linear feet of eroded revetment material.

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against erosion to a flood containment levee that reduces risk of flooding to 50+ homes in the Si View Park neighborhood.

Goals and objectives: Repair the erosion damage by replacing missing face rock. Specific objectives include: identify and evaluate alternatives for repair of damaged facility, design and permit the selected alternative, and construct the selected alternative in summer 2018.

Existing site conditions: Previous revetment face rock has eroded.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: This river reach experiences low use (fewer than 10% of users) by all categories of river recreationists.

Intended large wood function: The repair project goals do not include wood placement. It is a requirement in order to receive necessary environmental permits. The wood that will be placed as permit conditions is not expected to change the background wood loading in the system.

Project manager: Stella Torres

Completed: 2018

Project name: Singer Judd Creek Pond Enhancement

Location: Judd Creek

Description: The project involved sealing an old culvert that presently serves as the pond’s outflow and creating a new channel connecting the south end of Singer Pond to Judd Creek. Woody debris was placed in Judd Creek and consist of 40 to 60 logs, 10 to 12 inches in diameter and 20 to 25 feet in length.

Purpose and importance: To improve water quality and create habitat for the Judd Creek basin and Paradise Valley. Both the pond and the new channel will be planted with native plants and emergent vegetation.

Goals and objectives: Woody debris and native plants will be installed in and around Judd Creek, helping to restore instream habitat and degraded riparian areas

Existing conditions: Degraded riparian land due to grazing and agriculture.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: None, other than hiking on nearby trails.

Intended large wood function: Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Cody Toal

Completed: 2011

Project name: Sinnema Quaale Upper Revetment analysis and repair project

Location: Snoqualmie River between Carnation and Duvall.

Description: Reconstruction of failing upper end of revetment.

Purpose and importance: High priority project to protect against river hazard.

Goals and objectives: Interrupt bank erosion threatening SR 203 and the Snoqualmie Valley Trail in a manner consistent with the Flood Hazard Management Plan goals and objectives.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Recreational use is very low.

Intended large wood function: Stabilize bank and improve ecological conditions.

Project manager: Chase Barton

Completed: 2016

Location: Snoqualmie River, Right Bank, RM 23.1-23.3

Description: Levee breach and channel excavation with setback flood protection. Nine pieces of large wood placed in backwater area. A dozen or more small trees placed in floodplain.

Purpose and importance: To enhance rearing and refuge habitat for endangered Chinook in the Snoqualmie River and reduce flood facility maintenance requirements.

Goals and objectives: Restore floodplain connectivity by breaching confining levee.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Moderate use by floaters, boaters, and fishermen.

Intended large wood function: Large wood provides habitat value and meets Washington State Department of Transportation mitigation needs. Placing felled trees in the floodplain provides habitat value and reduces hauling cost.

Project manager: Fauna Nopp

Completed: 2012

Location: Snoqualmie River near Carnation at the intersection of NE Carnation Farm Rd and 310th Ave NE.

Description: Repair of 300 linear feet of eroded revetment material. 

Purpose and importance: Emergency project to protect against erosion and reduce risk of flooding to 310th Ave NE, Game Haven Farm and surrounding homes and properties.

Goals and objectives: Repair the damage by rebuilding the eroded bank with rock and installing wood elements to provide protection from scour and erosion. Specific objectives include: identify and evaluate alternatives for a near-term repair that can be designed, permitted and constructed by the end of September 2018; construct a repair that is sufficient to protect the facility until a long-term project can be implemented (2-5years); and conduct stakeholder coordination and work with residents throughout the project cycle.

Existing site conditions: Previous revetment segment has eroded and river bank is receding toward 310th Ave NE.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: The Snoqualmie River is used for several types of recreational activities in the project site vicinity including jet skiing, fishing, casual floating, stand up paddle boarding, canoeing, and kayaking. However, recreational use in the Snoqualmie River in the project reach (between river miles 21.8 - 22.4) has been classified as generally infrequent.

Intended large wood function: The project design does not have any large wood placement incorporated into the face of the revetment. There will be 12-15 ballasted wood elements (vertical piles with attached root wads) installed in-water at the toe of the revetment to stabilize the slope prior to the upcoming flood season in a manner that will minimize impacts to ESA listed species in the Snoqualmie River and provide protection by reducing velocities and curtailing accelerated bank erosion.

Project status:

Project manager: Stella Torres

Anticipated construction: 2018

Project name: Tate Creek Drainage Improvement

Location: Tate Creek at North Fork Road Southeast

Description: Sediment removal from the river channel.

Purpose and importance: Improve flow capacity of stream channel and reduce inundation of surrounding properties.

Goals and objectives: Large wood was installed to reduce erosion on banks of channel.

Existing conditions: The project was an emergency response to a beaver dam break and flooding outside of the channel.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: Low or no use by floaters, boaters, fishermen.

Intended large wood function:  Bank stability and fish habitat.

Project manager: Shannon Kelly

Completed: 2011

Project name: Upper Carlson Floodplain Restoration Project

Location: Snoqualmie River, RM 33, right bank

Description: Removed 1,600 linear feet of existing levee and associated toe rock along the right bank. Construct 1,500 linear feet setback revetment, including several engineered log structures within the right bank floodplain adjacent to Neal Road.

Purpose and importance: This project is a prioritized action to implement Salmon Recovery Plan recommendations for the Fall City Reach of the Snoqualmie River. The Fall City Reach has been identified as one of the most important and productive reaches in the Snoqualmie.

Goals and objectives: To reconnect the Snoqualmie River to the floodplain and associated side channels and restore channel and floodplain processes, including: channel widening, channel migration, large wood recruitment and retention and natural distribution of sediment throughout the reach.

Recreational uses, timing, intensity: There are a wide variety of recreational users and crafts year-around, but with more intensive use during warm summer days. There is a Washington Sate Department of Fish and Wildlife access and parking is located on the downstream end of the project site.

Intended large wood function: Large wood was used in bank protection structures on the right bank along Neal road and in the floodplain adjacent to the existing levee. Along Neal road, a mix of large logs, driven piles, and engineered logjams was incorporated in the design to improve the reliability of existing and new bank protection measures while providing more complex, higher quality fish habitat. In the floodplain, upon removal of the levee, large existing trees will be recruited to the river and dramatically improve the quality of mainstem edge habitat along the right bank.

Project manager: Dan Eastman

Completed: 2014

For more information about projects with large wood installations, please contact Laird O'Rollins, ecologist, WLR Ecological Services and Engineering Services Unit.