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Education resources

Wastewater

Stormwater

Water

Wastewater

Stormwater

Natural Yard Care

Wastewater

Stormwater

  • King County Stormwater Programs (4th-12th grade; in-classroom and at Brightwater & South Treatment Plant)
  • Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center: Water Testing (Secondary) - Don gloves and goggles as you determine the pH and dissolved oxygen levels of water samples from Mercer Slough. What do these tests tell about the health of the ecosystem?
  • IslandWood (at Brightwater): Freshwater Ecosystem Investigation (Elementary) - In this field experience, students engage in the scientific process by comparing aquatic macroinvertebrates from two pond ecosystems in the Brightwater Center natural area.
  • IslandWood (at Brightwater): Landforms Investigation (Elementary) - Students will conduct field investigation in the Brightwater Center natural area, studying erosion, deposition, properties of streams, and run-off.
  • King Conservation District: Wheels on Water (K-6th grade) - Free school age field trips that give students a better understanding of water and soil conservation as well as stormwater protection.
  • Nature Vision: Watershed Connections (Elementary and Secondary) - One hour in classroom presentation that highlights the challenges our local watershed faces with stormwater runoff.
  • Nature Vision: Stream Connections (Elementary and Secondary)- A Nature Vision educator will meet your class at your local stream and facilitate a variety of activities related to salmon and the effects of stormwater.
  • Nature Vision: Wetland Connections (Elementary and Secondary) - A Nature Vision educator will meet your class at your local wetland, retention pond, or location of your choice to facilitate activities that show the importance of these unique ecosystems in helping manage the effects of stormwater runoff.
  • Nature Vision: Blue Teams (Elementary and Secondary) - Blue Teams are groups of kindergarden-12th grade students who commit to taking on and completing a watershed stewardship project.
  • STC Kits: Land and Water (Elementary) - Land and Water invites students to manipulate their stream table model, create hills, build dams, and grow vegetation to observe how these things affect land and water interactions.
  • Salish Sea Expeditions: SOURCE Program - This land-based program is focused on supporting students in investigation of their local watershed, building awareness about water quality and stormwater issues in the Puget Sound region.

Wastewater

Stormwater

King County Wastewater Treatment Division offers a variety of resources to educators to support bringing clean water education into the classroom. The kits listed below are available for check out to use in your classroom.

To check out a kit from the Brightwater Education Center, CONTACT:
Unit name Unit purpose Unit objectives
Wastewater for Wee Ones (K-2 grade)
  • Introduce students to all forms and uses of water around them
  • Encourage students to make small changes in their behaviors that keep out water resources clean
Students will:
  • Identify water in natural and man-made environments
  • Identify uses for water inside
  • Discuss the water cycle
  • Learn the three states of water
  • Understand that we are connected to the water cycle
  • Understand what wastewater is and where it comes from
  • Learn where wastewater goes and why it’s important to clean
  • Discuss water conservation and the importance of the concept
Wonders of Wastewater (grades 3-5)
  • Introduce students to wastewater
  • Teach where wastewater comes from and how it is treated before returning to the environment
  • Educate students about how wastewater treatment plants work and what they can do to help manage what is in wastewater
Students will:
  • Understand how the water they use in their homes relates to the water cycle
  • Be able to explain how their daily water choices impact the health of the Puget Sound
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of the wastewater treatment plant in protecting the Puget Sound.
  • Be able to list human inputs and outputs in the wastewater stream and where those outputs ultimately end up.
  • Understand that we are connected to the water cycle
  • learn how the wastewater treatment plant works and what they can do to help manage what is in wastewater.
  • Know why we treat our wastewater and what happens when we don’t treat our waste properly.

The following titles are available from the King County Library System:

Books

Films

Wastewater treatment in King County

Get involved

Emerging issues

New information is continually emerging about the natural and synthetic chemicals people dispose of every day in their sinks and toilets. While scientists nationally and internationally study the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), King County is taking several preventive steps to protect public health and the environment (refer to fact sheet).

Downloads and resources

Studies have shown that pharmaceuticals and chemicals in our personal care products (shampoos, lotions, perfume, bug sprays) are present in our nation's waterbodies. Research suggests that certain chemicals in drugs and personal care products may cause ecological harm.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other organizations are committed to investigating this topic and developing strategies to help protect the health of both the environment and the public. To date, scientists have found no evidence of adverse human health effects from PPCPs in the environment. Learn more about: