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King County Executive
Dow Constantine


King County awards COVID-19 relief grants to regional science organizations, arts and culture, and independent live music venues

Summary

King County provided $2 million in one-time grants to science, arts and culture organizations, and independent live music venues disrupted by COVID-19 across the region. The program is tailored to organizations that draw tourists and is designed to ease the economic burden of the pandemic while also increasing public health measures.

Story

With $2 million of funding backed by the federal CARES Act, King County awarded a total of 62 grants in three categories:

    • Music venues (35 awards)
    • Arts, culture and science educations organizations (21 awards)
    • Science organizations (6 awards)

The grant funds will improve compliance with public health safety measures as these organizations reopen to support the county’s economic recovery and enhance residents’ quality of life.

Grants may be used to reimburse a variety of costs between March 1 and December, such as payroll, rent, mortgage payments (excluding property taxes), healthcare insurance for employees, and utility expenses necessary to sustain the business during and after the public health emergency.

In addition, the grants may also be used for public health measures necessary to prepare for safe reopening, including, for example, plastic barriers and floor markings or public outreach and education materials.

“We must do everything possible to help our small businesses and arts and cultural organizations emerge from the crisis alive, well, and ready to put thousands of people back to work. By carefully and thoughtfully helping with rent, payroll and other expenses, we can help ensure that more of our cultural touchstones survive and continue to contribute to the vitality of our region,” said Executive Constantine.  

“We would like to express our sincere gratitude to King County for the grant awarded to our music venue as part of the County’s COVID Relief Grant Program. These are very challenging times and it is especially gratifying to be heard and supported in this way,” said Carlene Comrie and Dwayne Blake, owners of the Red Lounge in the Central District.

“Public support has been, and will continue to be, vital in preserving our essential live music venues,” said Jodi Ecklund, owner of the Clock-Out Lounge on Beacon Hill.

“I couldn’t be more grateful for the support from King County, nor could it have come at a better time,” said Hallie Kuperman at Century Ballroom on Capitol Hill. “All music and nightlife venues need right now is financial support, pure and simple.  If we want our arts community and economy to rebound, we need money to get us through this period. We will wait until it is safe for patrons and staff to operate again, which means our doors will be shut for longer than most. Thank you, Executive Constantine and King County for recognizing the importance of Arts in our community.” 

A full list of the grant awardees is available here.

 

Relevant links

Quotes

We must do everything possible to help our small businesses and arts and cultural organizations emerge from the crisis alive, well, and ready to put thousands of people back to work. By carefully and thoughtfully helping with rent, payroll and other expenses, we can help ensure that more of our cultural touchstones survive and continue to contribute to the vitality of our region.

Dow Constantine, King County Executive

We would like to express our sincere gratitude to King County for the grant awarded to our music venue as part of the County’s COVID Relief Grant Program. These are very challenging times and it is especially gratifying to be heard and supported in this way.

Carlene Comrie and Dwayne Blake, owners of the Red Lounge.

Public support has been, and will continue to be, vital in preserving our essential live music venues.

Jodi Ecklund, owner of the Clock-Out Lounge

I couldn’t be more grateful for the support from King County, nor could it have come at a better time. All music and nightlife venues need right now is financial support, pure and simple.  If we want our arts community and economy to rebound, we need money to get us through this period. We will wait until it is safe for patrons and staff to operate again, which means our doors will be shut for longer than most. Thank you, Executive Constantine and King County for recognizing the importance of arts in our community.

Hallie Kuperman of Century Ballroom

For more information, contact:

Alex Fryer, Executive Office, 206-477-7966


King County Executive
Dow Constantine
Dow constantine portrait

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