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King County Executive
Dow Constantine


King County employees offer help to neighbors across the Pacific

Summary

In response to the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, King County Executive Dow Constantine today made it possible for King County employees to convert their personal accrued leave time into a cash donation to the American Red Cross. The Red Cross will use the money to provide first aid, support, and relief supplies to people affected by the disaster.

Story

In response to the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, King County Executive Dow Constantine today made it possible for King County employees to convert their personal accrued leave time into a cash donation to the American Red Cross. The Red Cross will use the money to provide first aid, support, and relief supplies to people affected by the disaster.

“Like most of you, I have been taken aback by the sheer magnitude of the devastation in Japan,” said Executive Constantine. “As more images of the destruction and stories of human misery are revealed, many of our employees have expressed their desire to help our neighbors on the other side of the Pacific. This program is just one way in which King County employees can give back to the global community and help those in need.”

Under the Executive Order, County employees will be able to convert up to 40 hours of vacation or compensatory time into a cash donation to the American Red Cross. Employees will have 45 days to complete a form and have their contribution deducted through the payroll system.

A similar donation program was enacted by King County after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. After that disaster, 367 King County employees donated more than 5,500 hours, resulting in a gift of nearly $200,000 to Global Impact, a federation of 55 international aid agencies that provided desperately needed humanitarian assistance to Haiti.

“Our thoughts continue to be with the people of Japan and all those, here and around the world, who have been affected by this tragedy,” Executive Constantine added. “The generous and caring employees of King County stand with people of Japan as they deal with this unprecedented emergency.”

Experts at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Washington Department of Health do not expect significant levels of radioactivity in our state or any health risk from the nuclear reactor situation in Japan. As a precaution, federal and state agencies will continue to monitor radiation levels in the air and rain water. King County will provide links and updates on our information page as events unfold.



Related information

King County Executive
Dow Constantine
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