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Metro preparing for a snowy morning commute

Summary

With the weather forecast calling for the possibility of the first widespread snow of the season, Metro is making plans for a snowy Friday commute.

Story

Some bus service may be reduced; sign up for alerts

With the weather forecast calling for the possibility of the first widespread snow of the season, Metro is making plans for a snowy Friday commute.

If snow does move into the area overnight, Metro may substitute articulated electric trolley buses operating in and around downtown Seattle with other available buses that can perform better in snow. If that becomes necessary, there could be some reduction in the number of bus trips during the commute.

Metro will continue to monitor the weather and chain its fleet for the morning commute if necessary, based on the forecast.

Riders should prepare for possible service delays and crowding Friday morning in case some bus trips are canceled or rerouted, and road conditions make travel more difficult.

Here are some tips for riders planning to travel tomorrow:

  • Sign up to receive Transit Alerts for the routes you use.
  • Check the print and online timetables for snow route maps.
  • If the weather is bad, check the color-coded status map on Metro Online before you travel.
  • Be patient. Buses are not always on schedule in snowy or icy conditions. Increased ridership during bad weather can result in crowded buses and a longer-than-usual wait on the phone for the Customer Information 206-553-3000.
  • Your favorite smartphone apps and online trackers may not be reliable when buses are rerouted or significantly delayed.
  • Dress warmly for the walk to the bus stop, expect delays, and wear appropriate footwear for the weather.
  • Head for bus stops on main arterials or at major transfer points such as park-and-ride lots, transit centers, or shopping centers.
  • Riders should wait at bus stops at the very top or very bottom of hills, because buses are often unable to stop for passengers on inclines.