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Responding to AIDS - Home   |    About this Exhibit - Introduction   |    AIDS Emerges   |    Poised to Respond   |    New Programs: Working Together   |    Responding to Fear   |    The AIDS Prevention Project   |    A Leader in Research, Education, and Housing   |   
   |    Expanding Outreach   |    Needle Exchanges   |    The AIDS Omnibus Act: New Mandates   |    Safer Sex: The New Normal?   |    The Legacy   |    Gallery   |    Oral Histories    |    References and Resources


Expanding Outreach

The People of Color Against AIDS Network

The People of Color Against AIDS Network (POCAAN), a Seattle-based, multi-racial community coalition, provided HIV/AIDS education and training aimed at Latino, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander and Native American communities.

King County’s administrative director for AIDS programs, Patricia McInturff (formerly Patricia Canova), saw that the AIDS epidemic would not spare communities of color. She supported POCAAN’s principles and committed the Public Health Department to working closely and often with the group. In one early collaborative project, POCAAN, using seed money from the AIDS Prevention Project, created the 1988 “Famous Last Words” educational campaign to increase awareness of AIDS among people of color.

Patricia McInturff talks about the need to reach communities who had fewer resources and political connections than did gay activist organizations. (Oral history interview, September 2015.)


“POCAAN’s coalition building effort is to bring people together across color, gender, sexual orientation, agency affiliation and community lines. POCAAN provides a forum for dispelling myths and fears, and for enabling people of color to work together in unity….We must confront the effects of the isolation caused by homophobia in communities of color, and by the racism of the gay/lesbian community.” — from POCAAN’s mission statement

1825-3-16-famous-last-words_I-dont-need-to-wear-one 1825-3-16-famous-last-words-and-other-pamphlets-POCAAN_Page_1 1825-3-16-famous-last-words-and-other-pamphlets-POCAAN_Page_2

 

Poster and brochures from the "Famous Last Words" series, published by POCAAN with support from Public Health. (Series 1825.3.16 and 1825.3.20 - History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division/HIV-AIDS Program.)


1825-3-17-POCAAN_comic_English_1988_cover 1825-4-6-POCAAN-comic-draft-storyboard_Page_02_Image_0001

 

AIDS News comic book published by POCAAN in 1988 and the storyboard for the comic. (Series 1825.3.17 and 1825.4.6 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)


King County Archives · POCAAN -- Karen Hartfield

Karen Hartfield describes how Public Health worked with POCAAN. (Oral history interview, August 2015).

At Risk and Hard to Reach

In 1989 the federal Centers for Disease Control renewed the APP’s original Community Demonstration Project Grant. The grant expanded the program to target hard-to-reach populations, including street youth and sex industry workers. The candid personal stories used by outreach programs such as Street Kids AIDS Training and Education (SKATE) and Girlfriends Talking reflected the reality of people’s lives.

Street Kids AIDS Training & Education

With funding from Public Health, POCAAN produced a series of posters that shared stories from homeless youth learning to adopt condom use and other STD prevention strategies.

People in danger

Karen Hartfield outlines the groups who were at the highest risk of contracting AIDS and who were the focus of the APP’s outreach and education programs.


Girlfriends Talking

The Girlfriends Talking campaign was directed at African American women who were disproportionately affected by AIDS, including women using drugs or working in the sex industry.


1825-12-4-being-responsible-is-a-lot-easier
(Series 1825.12.4 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-12-4-doing-my-part
(Series 1825.12.4 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-12-4-you-can-share-your-body
(Series 1825.12.4 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-12-4-no-excuse
(Series 1825.12.4 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-12-3-her-baby-comes-first
(Series 1825.3.13 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-3-13-Girlfriends-talking0002
(Series 1825.3.13 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-3-13-Girlfriends-talking0003
(Series 1825.3.13 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-3-13-Girlfriends-talking0001
(Series 1825.3.13 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)

Barriers to AIDS Education

Karen Hartfield, APP Education Team Coordinator and founding board member of POCAAN, describes perceptions about AIDS among African Americans in the mid-1980s, when she directed a sexuality education program for parents and their children for the Seattle Urban League. (Oral history interview, August 2015.)

Robert Wood posits that gay stigma prevents some members of minority communities from obtaining early HIV testing and treatment today. (Oral history interview, August 2015.)


Outreach to Latinos and Native Americans

Public Health also supported POCAAN campaigns oriented toward the Latino and Native American communities. The posters below were published in partnership with the Seattle Indian Health Board, the Coalition of Latinos in Washington against AIDS, and the Northwest AIDS Foundation and Planned Parenthood.

1825-14-1_-_Get_With_the_Program
(Series 1825.14.1 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825-14-1-_Con_Carino
(Series 1825.14.1 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)
1825141AmigaHeMayNotLikeIt
(Series 1825.14.1 – History files, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health: Prevention Division / HIV-AIDS Program.)



Responding to AIDS

An exhibit and oral history project from the King County Archives.

Content warning: The archival records featured in this exhibit discuss sexual behavior and illegal drug use. Please direct questions or comments to archives@kingcounty.gov

Copyright King County Archives, Seattle Washington, June 2016.


 

MLK

 

Please note: This exhibit features historical materials relating to HIV/AIDS. For current health information, please visit Public Health, Seattle & King County - HIV/AIDS and STD Prevention and Education.


 4CultureLogo

 

Oral histories produced with support from a 2015 4Culture Heritage Projects Grant.