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Public Health news and blog



King County reducing density in shelters by moving nearly 400 people to hotels; and Public Health—Seattle & King County announces 175 new cases for April 2, 2020

Summary

King County continues to reduce shelter concentrations by moving nearly 400 people to hotels. Public Health—Seattle & King County reported 175 new cases of COVID-19 today, bringing the official case count in King County to 2656. In addition, 11 new deaths are reported, bringing the total of deaths in King County to 175.

Story

King County continues to reduce shelter concentrations by moving nearly 400 people to hotels

In a continuing effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus and prevent the transmission of illness through the homeless shelter population, King County has negotiated with three local hotels to serve as temporary shelter locations for people experiencing homelessness.

This is another in a series of actions King County is taking to “de-intensify” the concentration of people in shelters. This action also will allow locations to stay open 24/7, and meals will be provided. Onsite services and oversight will be provided by the shelter operators.

These are not isolation and quarantine facilities. The people who are moving are presumed to be well.

The transition to the hotel sites will happen early next week:

  • The Sophia Way is moving 100 people from a shelter site in Bellevue to a hotel in Bellevue, at 625 116th Avenue NE.
  • Catholic Community Services is moving 90 people from shelter sites in Kent, Federal Way and Renton to a SeaTac hotel, at 2900 S. 192nd Street.
  • Downtown Emergency Service Center (DESC) is moving 200 people from its Seattle shelters to a hotel in Renton, at 1 South Grady Way.

King County is finalizing agreements with the three hotels. The hotels will not be open to other guests during this time.

Everyone, even people who are young and healthy, must stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19. Each individual’s actions affect the health of our entire community, and what we do as a community protects us all. Stand Together, Stay Apart.

For additional information about COVID-19 and the response in King County, be sure to check our webpage: www.kingcounty.gov/covid

Case updates

Public Health—Seattle & King County is reporting the following confirmed cases and deaths due to COVID-19 through 11:59 p.m. on 4/1/20.

  • 2,656 confirmed positive cases (up 175 from yesterday)
  • 175 confirmed deaths (up 11 from yesterday)

Important note: With the launch of a new data dashboard (www.kingcounty.gov/covid/data), Public Health no longer lists individual deaths by age and gender in our News Release. Detailed information about demographics of those who died from COVID-19 is available on the dashboard. Be sure to click the button to filter by “positive results only” to see age and gender of deaths.

Isolation and quarantine facilities update

Isolation and quarantine is a proven public health practice for reducing the spread of disease. Examples of people who may need this assistance include people who cannot safely isolate from a family member who is elderly or medically fragile, or people experiencing homelessness. Individuals can only be placed into the King County sites after a health professional with Public Health—Seattle & King County has determined that they need isolation or quarantine.

Thirty-three people are currently staying in King County isolation and quarantine facilities.

The number of people at King County's isolation and quarantine sites will be included in regular updates provided by Public Health. No other identifying or personal information will be provided.