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Snoqualmie Valley Trail closure needed for bridge replacement work in North Bend

Summary

A King County Parks project to replace a dilapidated and damaged timber bridge along the Snoqualmie Valley Trail will require a lengthy closure of a 1.7-mile-long portion of the popular trail through North Bend.

Story

A King County Parks project to replace a dilapidated and damaged timber bridge along the Snoqualmie Valley Trail will require a lengthy closure of a 1.7-mile-long portion of the popular trail through North Bend.

Beginning April 29, the trail will be closed between the Mt. Si Golf Course and the trail’s intersection with Main Avenue North in downtown North Bend.

Crews will remove an old timber bridge across a small wetland along the trail and replace the dilapidated structure with a new single-span steel girder bridge. The total project cost is slightly less than $300,000.

The work is expected to take about four months to complete, and this stretch of trail should reopen in late August.

Because of limited access points and the isolated location of the work area, there will be no designated trail detour around the worksite. Trail users are advised to take advantage of other King County regional trails, which can be viewed on the website.

For more information about this project please contact Chris Erickson, Capital Project Manager, or call 206-263-0445.

At more than 31 miles in length, the Snoqualmie Valley Trail is the longest trail in King County’s 175-mile regional trail system. The trail winds through the largely rural Snoqualmie River Valley, passing working farms and forests, as well as the cities of Duvall, Carnation, Snoqualmie and North Bend.

The trail connects with the cross-state John Wayne Pioneer Trail at its southern end and offers access to such notable destinations as Tolt-MacDonald Park, Meadowbrook Farm and the Three Forks Natural Area.

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Celebrating its 75th Anniversary, King County Parks - Your Big Backyard - offers more than 200 parks and 26,000 acres of parks and natural lands, including such regional treasures as Marymoor Park and Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park, 175 miles of regional trails, 180 miles of backcountry trails and a world-class aquatic center. By cultivating strong relationships with non-profit, corporate and community partners, King County Parks enhances park amenities while reducing costs. Learn more at https://www.kingcounty.gov/parks/.