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Recognizing Outstanding achievement in Environmental Stewardship

Green Globe AwardThis is the fourth time the county's Department of Natural Resources has presented the Green Globe Awards. The biennial award was first given on Earth Day 1997. All recipients excel in leadership and activities that foster environmental stewardship by protecting the environment, managing natural resources and benefiting the community.

Nominees are participants in various programs sponsored by the County. Currently hundreds of businesses actively participate in County programs and thousands of citizens work hand-in- hand with us to protect our environmental legacy.

The award itself, designed by internationally known artist Gerry Newcomb, is made of recycled glass and marble.

Award Winners

Leader in Market Development for Recyclable Materials Award
TriVitro Corporation

Leader in Sustainable Building
GLY Construction

Leader in Hazardous Waste Reduction
Madison Carnolia Cleaners

Leader in Water Quality Protection
JB Instant Lawn

Leader in Habitat Protection
Full Circle Farm

Leader in Industrial Waste Reduction
Boeing Commercial Airplane Group - Renton

Leader in Resource Management
Cascade Farm and Stables

Leader in Waste Prevention, Recycling and Use of Recycled Materials
Brookfield Veterinary Hospital

Environmental Catalyst
Carol James

Leader in Market Development
TriVitro Corporation

TriVitro accepting the award from Executive SimsTriVitro Corporation of Kent will receive the Leader in Market Development for Recyclable Materials Award for its outstanding efforts in creating markets for recyclable materials and products. For almost ten years, TriVitro has been converting low-value scrap glass from King County's recycling programs into a variety of useful, value-added environmentally beneficial products. Included among those products are industrial blasting abrasives; crushed glass filtration medium, which is now used in swimming pools throughout King County and the Pacific Northwest; colored glass aggregate for beautiful terrazzo-like flooring; and tumbled glass for home, gift, garden and craft markets throughout the country. TriVitro recycled glass products can be seen in the floors of SeaTac Airport, the Washington State Convention and Trade Center and the entry rotunda at Safeco Field.

Leader in Sustainable Building
GLY Construction

GLY Construction accepting the award from Executive SimsGLY Construction in Bellevue will receive the Leader in Sustainable Building Award for its success and leadership in sustainable building. GLY has been a leader in construction recycling and sustainable jobsite practices. GLY is an active member of the U.S. Green Building Council and provides sustainable building training and resources to their employees. All GLY projects are organized to meet a number of sustainable building criteria including job-site recycling, energy efficiency, erosion control, and indoor air quality measures. A recent example of these outstanding efforts is the company's work on a high-tech office building and parking structure in Redmond. GLY's efforts to recycle ceiling tiles, asphalt, cardboard, carpet, drywall, land-clearing, metals, plastic film and wood diverted 70 to 75 percent of their wastes from the landfill. Detailed site planning minimized removal of existing vegetation on-site and existing asphalt paving was ground and re-used as backfill.

Leader in Hazardous Waste Reduction
Madison Carnolia Cleaners

Dick Turner accepting his award from Executive SimsMadison Carnolia Cleaners in Seattle will receive the Leader in Hazardous Waste Reduction Award for its demonstration of outstanding leadership in reducing hazardous waste and promoting the ethic of environmental responsibility within the drycleaning industry. Installing dry-to-dry equipment and a high-tech wet cleaning process (the first in the state) helped Madison Carnolia reduce perc solvent 73 percent. Process wastewater is treated to non-hazardous levels of solvent, then evaporated. This local cleaner recycles cardboard, hangers, plastics and unclaimed clothing. A lighting retrofit program, in addition to other energy savings measures, helped reduce their energy use 56 percent for a savings of $1,218 annually.

Owner Dick Turner works to make these practices widespread in the dry cleaning industry. A past President of the Northwest Drycleaners, Turner has been an active leader in the effort to bring Washington's drycleaners up-to-speed with environmentally responsible practices and to raise the bar in the industry. He was instrumental in connecting government agencies and local drycleaners through a Korean-speaking representative. Madison Carnolia Cleaners was the first drycleaner in the region to be recognized with King County's highest five-star EnviroStars rating.

Leader in Water Quality Protection
JB Instant Lawn

JB Instant Lawn accepting the award from Executive SimsJB Instant Lawn in Redmond will receive the Leader in Water Quality Protection Award for its efforts to prevent pollution and protect the region's lakes, streams and Puget Sound. JB Instant Lawn has gone beyond what is required by King County and the Pollution Prevention Manual to implement water quality best management practices that protect the nearby Sammamish River. JB Instant Lawn has covered and contained its storage and fuel areas, washes vehicles and equipment on pervious areas without soap and solvents and provides spill kits in all of its vehicles. JB has also removed vehicle crossings from a drainage/stream channel through their property and eliminated storage and parking areas adjacent to the stream channel. With the requisite permits, the company removed sediment depositions from the stream channel to allow for healthier habitat and improved water quality. To improve pollutant removal such as sediment they planted vegetation and installed the most technologically advanced erosion control methods along their many drainage channels. They have removed culverts that allowed water from their fields to enter roadside ditches and other tributaries that ultimately discharge to the Sammamish. Ponds were created to collect stormwater flows and irrigation water for reuse in irrigation of nursery areas. Buffer areas were established so harvesting of turf does not create bare soil conditions that can cause erosion and contribute sediment to the Sammamish. They regraded and resurfaced field access and maintenance roads so surface water stays onsite to infiltrate, rather than sheet flow to adjacent ditches that would carry sediment and other pollutant to the Sammamish.

Leader in Habitat Protection
Full Circle Farm

Full Circle Farm accepting their award from Executive SimsFull Circle Farm in Kirkland will receive the Leader in Habitat Protection Award for its efforts to protect and restore fish and wildlife habitat. The partnership between business owner, Andrew Stout, and landowner, Bill Knusten, is a great example of how environmental stewardship is cultivated through generations. Brought together by a King County program called Farm Link, which partners retiring farmers and their land with young, aspiring farmers, the two have found kinship in their stewardship of the land. Bill is a retired dairyman who retired from dairying, but not agriculture. An agreement with King County created the opportunity to initiate a major stream and fish habitat restoration project on his property. Bill allows this reach of stream to be used for field trips for elected officials, environmental groups and training programs. Through Farm Link he leases his land to Andrew, who shares the same environmental ethics. Andrew owns Full Circle Farm, an organic crop farm that sells wholesale, retail and subscription produce. His farming is done in such a way to produce an excellent crop, while considering the impacts of planting and harvesting practices on the environment.

These two men show that being environmentally conscious can be accomplished in tandem with farming practices.

Leader in Industrial Waste Reduction
Boeing Commercial Airplane Group - Renton

Boeing accepting their award from Executive SimsBoeing Commercial Airplane Group - Renton will receive the Leader in Industrial Waste Reduction Award for its efforts to voluntarily implement innovative pollution prevention strategies, significantly updating is pretreatement equipment and methods, and significantly reducing the amount of industrial waste being discharged to King County water systems. Through updates and innovation, Boeing - Renton has significantly reduced the amount of chemicals it uses to treat wastewater and the amount of groundwater being discharged to the King County sewer. In 2001, Boeing - Renton completed a two-year upgrade of its wastewater treatment plant, considerably updating its pretreatment methods and equipment. These modifications resulted in improved control of the facility and reduced the amount of chemicals used to treat the water by approximately 25 percent. The company used an innovative trench sealing system to reduce the amount of groundwater being discharged to the King County sewer by more than 50 percent.

Leader in Resource Management
Cascade Farm and Stables

Cascade Farm accepting their award from Executive SimsCascade Farm and Stables in Auburn will receive the Leader in Resource Management Award for its efforts to conserve resource lands and promote innovative agricultural or forest management practices that protect the environment. Robert Keevers purchased his boarding stable as a run down facility in dire need of renovation. Robert has not only restored damaged areas on his property, he also enhanced them creating what is a model others seek to follow. Improvements Robert has made include forage for storm water filter, manure management to prevent contaminated run-off and to properly fertilize fields, construction of confinement areas for horses to allow pastures to maintain healthy forage lengths, and keeping horses away from waterways to prevent sediment and nutrient overload. He also created a designated wildlife habitat area on his farm. Robert shares his learning experience generously and enthusiastically. He offers 'Farm Tours' so others can visit and learn. His farm is an inspiration to others.

Leader in Waste Prevention, Recycling and Use of Recycled Materials
Brookfield Veterinary Hospital

Brookfield Veterinary Hospital staff accepting their award from Executive SimsBrookfield Veterinary Hospital in Redmond will receive the Leader in Recycling, Waste Prevention and Use of Recycled Materials Award for its outstanding efforts to prevent waste, recycle and use recycled products in the workplace. Brookfield is a perfect example of how a little ingenuity and conscientiousness can make a big difference. This vet's office has implemented a paperless check-in process. Pet owners are asked to fill out laminated charts with patient information. Chart information is entered into a computer, and charts are wiped clean and reused over and over again. Employees use durable dishware instead of paper, recycled paper is used for printing and duplicating, used paper is loaded into the fax machine and is used to line pet cages, packaging materials like bubble wrap and packing peanuts are returned to packing stores for reuse, and office areas are cleaned with washable, reusable rags.

Environmental Catalyst
Carol James

Carol James accepting her award from Executive SimsCarol James will receive the Environmental Catalyst Award for her significant, long-term contributions toward fostering environmental stewardship in King County. Carol James has been an open space activist in King County for 20 years. She began her work in 1977 with Save Our Local Farmlands, where she successfully managed a campaign for voter-approved of $50 million to purchase development rights of farmland in King County. From 2000-2002 she chaired the Conservation Futures Citizen Oversight Committee. From 1984 - 1988 she co-chaired the citizens' committee to secure the land and design and fund the development of Bellevue's nationally recognized downtown park. Carol also chaired the King County Citizens Open Space Oversight Committee from 1989 - 1998. From 1990 to 1995 Carol served on the board of the Mountains to Sound Greenway, and has continued to participate through its advisory committee. Since 1997 Carol has served as Chair of the Cascade Land Conservancy's board of directors, where she was a founding board member. Carol is also an active board member of the Museum of History and Industry. In 1998 her many efforts were recognized when she was named citizen of the year by the Municipal League of King County.

For information on how you or your business can get involved, or on any of the Green Globe Award Winners, call 206-296-8361.