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These photos document hatchery work to stabilize and bolster the abundance of kokanee that live in Lake Sammamish and spawn in its tributaries with the long-term goal of restoring habitat and establish a viable, self-sustaining and fishable population that doesn’t need the support of a hatchery.  All photos on this page © Grace Reamer.

2009 kokanee ready for artificial spawning at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Wild kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery for supplemental spawning, Dec. 2009
2009 kokanee ready for egg and milt harvest at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Wild kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery for supplemental spawning, Dec. 2009
2009 kokanee spawning intervention at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Wild kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery for supplemental spawning, Dec. 2009
2009 Kokanee egg harvest at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Harvesting eggs from wild kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery, Dec. 2009
Kokanee eggs and milt in a plastic mixing bucket at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Eggs and milt from wild kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery, Dec. 2009
2009 kokanee after egg harvest at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Male kokanee from a 2003 survey of Laughing Jacobs Creek, a tributary to Lake Sammamish
2009 Kokanee at Issaquah Hatchery, by Grace Reamer
Male kokanee showing it's relative size, from Laughing Jacobs Creek

For questions about Lake Sammamish kokanee and these photos, please contact David St. John, government relations administrator, DNRP Water Policy Unit.