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Community and Human Services

Building vital communities, families and individuals
Department of Community and Human Services
Chinook Building
401 5th Ave, Suite 500
Seattle, WA 98104

e-mail us
Phone:  206-263-9100
Fax:   206-296-5260
TTY:   711 Relay Service

Adrienne Quinn, Director

Sherry Hamilton, Communications Manager

Employee Directory

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Topics: General | Housing | Youth | Developmental Disabilities | Mental Health and Substance Abuse

General contracting questions

Where do I find out what kinds of funds are available and what limitations may apply?

How can I apply for funding from DCHS?

What do I need to do to prove I am a nonprofit organization?

How much funding can I apply for?

What is an insurance endorsement form and why do you need it?

If my agency/organization already has an existing contract with King County, do I need to fill out the required forms again?

When can I invoice for reimbursement?

Housing contracting questions

I want to develop low-income housing. Can you help me?

Do you fund housing and housing repair projects in the City of Seattle?

What is the minimum and maximum request allowed for CDBG funding?

Youth services contracting questions

How do you define "youth at risk of being homeless"?

What does at-risk for juvenile justice involvement mean?

What is the Youth and Family Services Network?

How can I become a part of the Youth and Family Services Network?

Is there an alternative to implementing an evidence-based practice when evaluating Youth and Family Services outcomes?

Developmental disabilities contracting questions

What is a developmental disability and how is eligibility for service determined?

What experience do I need to serve people with developmental disabilities?

What do you mean by integration and inclusion for people with developmental disabilities?

Mental health or substance abuse services contracting questions

How do I become a Mental Health Network Service Provider?

How do I become licensed as a Community Mental Health Center and/or certified to provide chemical dependency services?

I am an individual practitioner who provides mental health services. Can I be a King County Mental Health Network Provider?

What are evidence-based practices in the alcohol and other drug prevention field?

There are only a few EBPs shown to be effective with certain ethnic and racial groups. Since our organization is unable to find an appropriate EBP to fit with our target population, does that mean we would be unable to apply for funding?

My organization is interested in offering alcohol and other drug prevention services. If I miss the opportunity to apply for funds through King County's competitive bid process, where else could I find support for my organization?

I am interested in learning more about alcohol and other drug prevention and possible other contracting opportunities.


Q: Where do I find out what kinds of funds are available and what limitations may apply?
A:
DCHS lists current funding and contracting opportunities on its Contracting front page.

Other King County contracting opportunities can be found on the King County Procurement Web page.

Q: How can I apply for funding from DCHS?
A:
As DCHS manages a wide variety of funding sources and service areas, each with different priorities and funding periods, the best thing to do is to call or e-mail the program contracting contact. He/she will be able to determine which funds your agency might potentially apply for and ensure that you receive notice when a relevant RFP is released.

Q: What do I need to do to prove I am a nonprofit organization?
A:
Register as a non-profit with the Washington State Secretary of State's Office and be approved as a non-profit by the Internal Revenue Service.

Q: How much funding can I apply for?
A:
In most cases, there is no set minimum or maximum, but it is expected that, to be competitive, a project must (a) show how county funds will leverage other resources, and b) demonstrate soundness in program design and budgeting.

Q: What is an insurance endorsement form and why do you need it?
A:
King County requires that, in addition to the certificate of insurance, you provide the actual endorsement, which contains the policy number and states that the policy has been modified to make "King County, its officers, officials, employees and agents" additional insured parties to the commercial and general liability policy. The endorsement applies to general/commercial liability insurance; automobile insurance does not require endorsements. The boilerplate details relevant insurance requirements for each contract.

Q: If my agency/organization already has an existing contract with King County, do I need to fill out the required forms again?
A:
It varies. Your contract monitor can tell you if your new work can be amended into the existing contract. If a new contract is required, and if the contract is for an amount of $25,000 or more and your agency/organization is not a public entity, you do not have to complete the Personal Inventory Report, Affidavit of Compliance and the 504/ADA Compliance Forms again. You also have to complete an Equal Benefits Form for each King County contract of $25,000 or more. Note that even if you don't have to complete certain forms again, you will have to submit copies to the county program you are working with. These forms are valid for two years

If the contract amount is $24,999 or below, the 504/ADA Compliance Form does not have to be completed again (if it is within the two-year validity period).

For ALL contract amounts, an updated Certificate of Insurance and Endorsement Page must be provided, covering the contract dates and listing King County as an additional insured.

Q: When can I invoice for reimbursement?
A:
The Compensation and Method of Payment Section of the contract outlines when the agency/organization is able to submit an invoice for reimbursement.

Q: I want to develop low-income housing. Can you help me?
A:
For information about funding for housing development, contact the Housing Finance Program.

Q: Do you fund housing and housing repair projects in the City of Seattle?
A:
Rarely. The City of Seattle receives its own federal housing funding, including Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. If your agency serves residents from a broader area (outside Seattle city limits) and those residents are unable to receive the services your agency provides unless they utilize your facility, then you would have the opportunity to apply for and potentially be funded with King County Consortium funds.

Q: What is the minimum and maximum request allowed for CDBG funding?
A:
$50,000 is the minimum (a guideline). There is no maximum threshold, but funds are becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, $500,000 has been the upper limit for funding awards.

Q: How do you define "youth at risk of being homeless"?
A:
A youth who is at-risk of being homeless primarily refers to youth who are aging out of foster care and who have no housing options subsequent to their discharge from the state's program. This may also include emancipated minors who may be losing housing or transitioning to stable housing.

Q: What does at-risk for juvenile justice involvement mean?
A:
For most DCHS programs, this term refers to youth that are exhibiting delinquent or violent behaviors, but have yet to be placed under some sort of court supervision.

Q: What is the Youth and Family Services Network?
A:
The Youth and Family Services Network (YFSN) is a network of community-based agencies that are located and serve youth and families in each of the 19 school districts in King County.  Youth with multiple risk factors are eligible for YFSN services, including case management, counseling, substance abuse prevention, family support, dropout prevention and education, youth development, violence prevention, and more.

Q: How can I become a part of the Youth and Family Services Network?
A:
At this time, additional agencies are unable to join.

Q: Is there an alternative to implementing an evidence-based practice for evaluating Youth and Family Services outcomes?
A:
Yes, however, programs should undergo process evaluation to ensure quality and fidelity to those elements that produce outcomes. One tool that at-risk youth service agencies may use is King County's Elements of Successful Programs, managed through the Youth and Family Services Program. This project identified the elements of programs that are most effective in reducing youth recidivism, delinquency and violence. It also provides a process evaluation tool to help agencies assess their programs and consistency with the most effective elements.

Q: What is a developmental disability and how is eligibility for service determined?
A:
The State Division of Developmental Disabilities determines eligibility. To be eligible for services a person must have a least one of the following conditions: mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, or another neurological condition similar to mental retardation. The disability must occur before age 18 and it must be expected to continue indefinitely and result in a substantial impairment.

Young children showing a developmental delay may be eligible for services. A developmental delay refers to a child acquiring skills and abilities more slowly than the norm for their age. The presence of a delay does not necessarily mean that a child has or will have a developmental disability. Some delays are temporary or can be overcome through intervention. Standardized evaluation tools are used to determine if a child is eligible.

Q: What experience do I need to serve people with developmental disabilities?
A:
1) Experience or knowledge in providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families in accordance with State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) policies and state and federal requirements; 2) An understanding of and commitment to the integration of individuals with developmental disabilities with people who are not disabled; 3) Birth to Three/Early Intervention service provider staff must be licensed and/or registered or certificated depending on their position (e.g. speech/language therapist, occupational therapist, etc.); and 4) clear and current criminal history background checks of all staff and volunteers providing a direct service to a child or vulnerable adult.

Q: What do you mean by integration and inclusion for people with developmental disabilities?
A:
Integration is a belief in every person's inherent right to participate fully in society. Inclusion implies acceptance of differences. The goal of inclusion is for all people, regardless of age, to lead productive lives as full, participating members of their communities.

Q. How do I become a Mental Health Network Service Provider?
A:
In order to become a Mental Health Network Service Provider, an agency must complete a King County Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division (MHCADSD) Agency Credentialing Application and be formally approved to provide services.

Q: How do I become licensed as a Community Mental Health Center and/or certified to provide chemical dependency services?
A:
To become licensed as a Community Mental Health Center, applicants must apply for a Community Mental Health Center License (WAC 388-865-0400) through the State of Washington Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Mental Health Division. See DSHS mental health licensing information here (external).

To become certified to provide chemical dependency services, applicants must apply for a Certificate of Approval (WAC 388-805) through the State of Washington Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse. For certification information, see DSHS provider certification information here. (external).

Q: I am an individual practitioner who provides mental health services. Can I be a King County Mental Health Network Provider?
A:
Individual practitioners are only able to participate in the network through a subcontractual relationship with a certified network provider.

Q: What are evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the alcohol and other drug prevention field?
A:
Evidence-based Practices (EBPs) - also referred to as Best Practices or Promising Approaches - generally relates to approaches in the alcohol and other drug prevention field that are validated and supported by documented scientific evidence. A main source for information about EBPs is the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) a service of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). See: www.nrepp.samhsa.gov (external)

Q: There are only a few evidence-based practices (EBPs) shown to be effective with certain ethnic and racial groups. Since our organization is unable to find an appropriate EBP to fit with our target population, does that mean we would be unable to apply for funding?
A:
King County acknowledges there is limited research in alcohol and other drug prevention field; therefore, allowances will be made in the competitive bid process for adaptations of EBPs as well as for innovative practices. Innovative practices must comply with the SAMHSA Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Principles of Effective Substance Abuse Prevention.

Q: My organization is interested in offering alcohol and other drug prevention services. If I miss an opportunity to apply for funds through King County's competitive bid process, where else could I find support for my organization?
A:
Although King County allocates the bulk of its funding through the competitive bid process, there is also another source of funds to support prevention training, primarily in EBPs. An application is available on the King County Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program web page. 

Q: I am interested in learning more about alcohol and other drug prevention and possible other contracting opportunities.
A:
Another valuable local resource for information about prevention training, events, funding and materials is the Washington Recovery Help Line web page here (external).