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Public Health - Seattle & King County

Infant, child and adolescent immunizations

Child patient Public Health provides the following information to provide more resources about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases, much in the same way you look for information on car seats, bicycle helmets, and age-appropriate toys. We hope you find this information useful.

Below you will find immunization schedules and back-to-school requirements for infants, children and adolescents, as well as vaccine preventable disease fact sheets and vaccine information. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Keeping childhood immunizations updated for the 2014-15 school year
Immunization schedules for infants, children and adolescents
Vaccines required for child care, preschool, and school attendance in Washington state
School immunization levels in King County
Specific vaccines
Where to go for immunizations
Local, state and federal contacts
Immunization schedules for infants, children and adolescents
Vaccines required for child care, preschool, and school attendance in Washington state
Specific vaccines

Public Health clinics provide routine immunizations for children 6 weeks to 19 years of age (to age 20 years for hepatitis B) for current patients through the public-funded "Vaccines For Children" (VFC) program. VFC was established in 1993 to remove the barriers of cost and access to attaining childhood immunizations. The program is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the State of Washington, and supplies vaccines to providers across the state. Almost 95% of public and private immunization providers in King County are currently enrolled. All children from birth up to the 19th birthday (hepatitis B up to the 20th birthday) are eligible to receive these vaccines. For more information, see the 'Where to Go for Immunizations' section.

  • DTaP, pediatric DT, Td, Tdap
    DTaP contains diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis vaccines for children age 6 weeks through 6 years. Pediatric DT contains diphtheria and tetanus without the pertussis components for children age 6 weeks through 6 years. "Adult" Td contains tetanus and a smaller amount of diphtheria than the pediatric version and is used for children age 7 years through adulthood. TdaP contains tetanus, a smaller amount of diphtheria than the pediatric version and is used for adolescents and adults. One brand is licensed for age 10 through 18 years and the second brand is licensed for age 11 through 64 years.
  • Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
    Hib vaccine is recommended routinely for children age 6 weeks through 4 years, but also may be given to older children and adults who have a poorly functioning spleen or no spleen. Because of manufacturing delays with one Hib vaccine manufacturer, there is a temporary decrease in Hib vaccine supply. CDC has advised providers not to give the Hib vaccine booster to healthy children aged 12-15 months. Providers should continue to give this booster to high-risk children with asplenia, sickle cell disease, HIV, other immune syndromes, or those who are Alaskan or Native American.
  • HPV (Human papillomavirus) vaccine
    HPV vaccine is an inactivated (not live) vaccine that can prevent most genital warts and most cases of cervical cancer.  Most HPV infections don't cause any symptoms, and go away on their own.  But HPV is important mainly because it can cause cervical cancer in women.  Every year in the U.S. about 10,000 women get cervical cancer and 3,700 die from it. It is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths among women around the world.

    More information:

    Where to get vaccine:

    Girls and boys from the ages of 9-18 years old can get the vaccine from many local health care providers. The vaccine is free through the VFC program. An administration fee might be charged but will be waived if you are unable to pay it.

    For 19-26 year olds, the HPV vaccine is available through some community health care providers and pharmacies. The vaccine is not free, but some health insurance providers may cover the cost.

  • Meningococcal
    There are two meningococcal vaccines -- meningococcal conjugate vaccine called Menactra and meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine called Menomune. Menactra is licensed for age 11-55 years and is routinely recommended for all adolescents age 11 through 18 years and for college freshmen living in dormitories, if they haven't already received it. Menomune is licensed for age 2 years and older. Both vaccines are used for travelers to certain areas and people with specific medical conditions.
  • Pertussis
    After decades of decline due to widespread vaccination, pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is making a global comeback. Last year, there were about 11,000 cases of the disease reported in the United States, the highest number in 30 years, according to a preliminary count from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The reason for the rise in whooping cough is unknown, but experts say outbreaks occurring largely among teenagers and adults could be attributed to the fact that immunity from the pertussis vaccine starts to wane about five to 10 years after the last dose is administered through age six years. Two vaccines containing tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) are now licensed in the United States for adolescents and adults to provide additional pertussis protection.
Where to go for immunizations

Public Health Centers provide routine immunizations for children 6 weeks through 18 years of age for families who are already patients. If you are not a current patient at a Public Health Center, contact your family doctor or health care provider for an appointment to access free vaccines through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program.

If you need help finding medical coverage for your child, call 206-296-3944 for South King County, or 206-296-4841 for Seattle and North & East King County.

If you need help finding a doctor for your child, please call:

  • Community Health Access Program (CHAP): 206-284-0331 or 800-756-5437 CHAP staff can refer you to a Community Health Clinic offering full health services, including immunizations. If you do not have medical coverage, clinic fees are based on your income.

  • Call the Family Health Hotline at 1-800-322-2588

If you need help finding immunization services only, please contact your neighborhood pharmacies. Many King County pharmacies offer immunizations to adolescents, and some offer vaccines to younger children.

Local, state and federal contacts
  • LOCAL: Public Health - Seattle & King County
    • Immunization Program: 206-296-4774
    • Vaccine Distribution Program: 206-296-4782
    • Communicable Disease Hotline: 206-296-4949
    • Email: vaccineinfo@kingcounty.gov

  • STATE: Washington State Immunization Program:
    • Main number: 360-236-3595

  • FEDERAL: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    • National Immunization Program e-mail address: nipinfo@cdc.gov
    • Telephone consultation: CDC-INFO Contact Center, staffed 8 am-11pm (EST)
    • English and Spanish: 1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)
    • CDC Fax Information Service: 1-888-CDC-FAXX (1-888-232-3299)