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Natural Resources and Parks

King County, Washington

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DNRP
Dec. 5, 2011

Pump station glass art tower illuminates Brightwater’s environmental purpose

Recycled water bottles give cover to odor control stack, illustrate utility mission

Glass towerWorkers today completed the installation of a 65-foot-tall glass tower art sculpture at the Brightwater Influent Pump Station in Bothell. Its dual purpose: to attractively ensconce the pump station’s odor control stack while educating people about the environmental mission of King County’s clean-water utility.

Internationally renowned artist Christian Moeller created the work, called Verdi, which is composed of more than 3,500 repurposed green glass water bottles. Moeller’s design and use of recycled materials connects the artwork to the pump station’s function of moving enormous amounts water through a treatment system so it can be reused or returned to the environment.

In designing Verdi, Moeller drew inspiration from the community water towers that are often a small town’s most prominent feature as well as a source of civic identity and pride. During daylight hours, the glass will reflect and refract sunlight. The sculpture will be illuminated at night once the tower’s lighting system is installed later this month.

“The striking design of the art tower and the Brightwater Pump Station’s attractive architecture further enhance the high quality image that is the trademark of the Bothell Business Park,” said Anne Heartsong of AEA Accounting and Management Services and property manager for the Bothell Business Park Owners Association. The Brightwater Pump Station is located at the business park’s entrance at the intersection of N.E. 195th and North Creek Parkway in Bothell.

Glass towerKing County’s Wastewater Treatment Division, working in partnership with 4Culture, the County’s cultural services agency, commissioned the piece under the guidelines of the 1% for Art Program, which utilized 1 percent of Brightwater’s applicable project costs, a total of $4.4 million, for art projects which were carefully integrated into Brightwater facilities and designed to educate people about the utility’s clean-water mission.

For additional information on Brightwater’s art and educational amenities, please visit http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/brightwater-center.aspx

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx.

Related information

Brightwater Center

Brightwater Project

King County Wastewater Treatment