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Updated September 27, 2017

As of September 27, 2017, Public Health was notified of two additional ill persons infected with Salmonella Stanley. One of the two ill persons is a Washington State resident who does not live in King County. Laboratory testing has confirmed that all nine ill persons were infected with a strain of Salmonella Stanley that has the same genetic fingerprint suggesting a common source of infection. Public Health investigators have not identified any common foods, restaurants, or other sources among any of the ill people interviewed.

Among the nine cases (6 female, 3 male; ages <1 year to 76 years old), known illness onset dates range from July 12–August 25, 2017. No ill persons were hospitalized. Public Health is attempting to re-interview each case to gather more information about possible risk factors for infection. In addition, Public Health is working with Washington State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to do addition laboratory testing. The source of the outbreak is still under investigation.

Updated August 16, 2017

On July 26th, Public Health was notified of a seventh ill person infected with Salmonella Stanley. Laboratory testing has confirmed that all seven ill persons were infected with a strain of Salmonella Stanley that has the same genetic fingerprint. Public Health investigators have not identified any common foods, restaurants, or other sources among any of the ill people interviewed.

Among the seven cases, known illness onset dates range from July 12 – July 19, 2017. Ill persons had a median age of 23 years and fifty-seven percent were female. No ill persons were hospitalized. At this time, no additional cases have been identified. The outbreak appears to be over; Public Health will provide updates if additional cases are identified.

Posted July 28, 2017

Public Health is investigating a salmonellosis outbreak caused by Salmonella Stanley, an uncommon strain of Salmonella bacteria. Six persons infected with Salmonella Stanley were reported to Public Health during July 17–July 24. On July 26-27, genetic fingerprinting results for four of the six cases became available, and all had the same genetic fingerprint, suggesting that they have some common source of infection; genetic fingerprinting for the other two cases is pending. This fingerprint has only been seen twice before in King County where two to six cases of Salmonella Stanley have been reported annually over the past several years. Public Health is attempting to interview each case to gather information about possible risk factors for infection. The source of the outbreak is still under investigation.

The median age of the cases is 21 years; three cases are female and three are male. None of the cases are known to have been hospitalized. Additional details on the investigation will be posted as they are available.

About Salmonellosis

Salmonellosis is a bacterial infection that is often spread through the fecal-oral route, through contaminated food and water, or through contact with animals and their environments. Symptoms of salmonellosis include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, and abdominal cramping. Illness typically lasts several days and people can spread infection to others even after symptoms resolve.

To prevent Salmonella infection:

  • Wash hands with soap and water after going to the bathroom, changing diapers, touching animals, and before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all meats thoroughly, especially poultry.
  • Wash cutting boards and counters used for meat or poultry preparation immediately after use to avoid cross contaminating other foods.

For more information about salmonellosis, see: