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Installing energy-efficient lighting at treatment plant to save King County $33,000 each year

Summary

King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division will save an estimated $33,000 each year in energy costs thanks to a grant from Puget Sound Energy that funded the installation of energy-efficient lighting at the South Treatment Plant in Renton.

Story

King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division will save an estimated $33,000 each year in energy costs thanks to a grant from Puget Sound Energy that funded the installation of energy-efficient lighting at the South Treatment Plant in Renton.

PSE’s $224,639 grant funded a large portion of the project, which replaced fluorescent lighting with more-efficient LEDs. It will reduce the division’s energy consumption by about 480,000 kilowatt hours each year. 

The project is the latest example of King County’s effort to reduce energy consumption and make its operations more efficient. Earlier this month in Federal Way, the County rolled out the largest installation of made-in-Washington solar panels at the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center, which will produce more than 100,000 kilowatt hours of greenhouse gas-free electricity each year.

Since 2007, PSE has awarded King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division more than $1 million in conservation grant funding to pursue innovative energy efficiency solutions in its facility operation.

Over the past six years, King County WTD energy-efficiency projects brought in $10.3 million in grants and $4.3 million in low-interest loans and bonds, which will ultimately save WTD ratepayers about $1.4 million each year.               

Every day, 1.5 million people in WTD's service area produce 175 million gallons of wastewater. The wastewater treatment process is energy intensive, and WTD is the largest user of electricity in all of King County government.

The Energy Program provides WTD with the energy management expertise that ensures energy is being used efficiently. The program has led multiple efforts to encourage and guide future efficiency projects.

The Energy Program falls in line with the ongoing strategic efforts King County is taking to lower energy cost and reduce fossil fuel emissions contributing to climate change.

King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division is already converting byproducts of the treatment process into resources – namely digester gas, excess heat, biosolids and reclaimed water. The division scrubs digester gas from the treatment process and uses it in several ways – for energy on site, to sell to Puget Sound Energy, or for powering large pumps and recycling the heat from the pumps.

For more information about WTD’s energy program, please visit: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/ResourceRecovery/Energy/WTDEnergyStatusReport.aspx.

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