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Learning farm yields bounty of benefits for students, community

Summary

A sustainable education partnership between King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division and Seattle University is making a difference for students and community members.

Story

A sustainable education partnership between King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division and Seattle University is making a difference for students and community members.

Through a five-year agreement, King County set aside an acre of unused land at its South Treatment Plant in Renton for Seattle University Environmental Studies Urban Agriculture students to learn about resource conservation, recycling, and land use by operating a small farm. 

Students nourish the soil with GroCo compost made with Loop® biosolids produced at the plant, which furthers King County’s understanding about the benefits of returning carbon and nutrients to the soil through the use of Loop.

Loop’s tremendous nutrient value feeds the soil in a healthy, natural way to help plants grow bigger and better. This fall, the students produced and harvested about 600 pounds of fresh produce that was donated to the Salvation Army Renton Food Bank.

King County will host two Great South Plant Harvest events on Oct. 26 and Nov. 9 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the South Treatment Plant, 1200 Monster Road S.W., Renton.  There will be volunteer work parties and opportunities to tour the farm and learn about its design and purpose. The event is free and children accompanied by an adult are welcome.

For questions or to RSVP, please contact Casey Plank at casey.plank@kingcounty.gov or call 206-477-5448.

More information about the project is available on the website.



A sustainable education partnership between King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division and Seattle University is making a difference for students and community members.