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Climate change talk highlights benefits of King County’s Loop biosolids

Summary

A presentation at Town Hall on Feb. 27 will highlight local efforts to curb climate change and feature information about how King County’s Loop biosolids keeps carbon out of the atmosphere.

Story

A presentation at Town Hall on Feb. 27 will highlight local efforts to curb climate change and feature information about how King County’s Loop biosolids keeps carbon out of the atmosphere.  

The presentation, Enlisting Nature to Stem Climate Change, is sponsored by Sustainable Path and takes place from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., Seattle.

King County project manager and soil scientist Kate Kurtz will talk briefly about the proven benefits of Loop biosolids as a powerful tool in sequestering and storing carbon to reduce greenhouse gasses.

Loop, produced by King County’s regional treatment plants for nearly 40 years, is carbon-rich and loaded with nutrients and organic matter that improve soil structure and moisture retention. Loop not only boosts plant growth, but some of the carbon stays in the soil for a long time, acting like a carbon sink that removes carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, which is one of the most cost-effective ways of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

The use of Loop or Loop-based composts also reduces demand for synthetic fertilizer, which takes a tremendous amount of fossil fuel to manufacture. By contrast, the production of Loop actually creates energy. The anaerobic digestion that makes Loop is a renewable source of biogas that can be scrubbed and sold as natural gas or used to make electricity.

Event and ticket information is available at http://townhallseattle.org/sustainable-path-biocarbon-as-a-solution-to-climate-change/.

To learn more about Loop and its ability to turn your dirt around for good, visit http://www.loopforyoursoil.com.

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