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Pipe connection work requires temporary closure of a section of West Commodore Way

Summary

On Saturday, June 2, a section of West Commodore Way will be closed for four months to enable workers to connect sewer lines in Seattle’s Interbay neighborhood to a new tunnel beneath the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

Story

On Saturday, June 2, a section of West Commodore Way will be closed for four months to enable workers to connect sewer lines in Seattle’s Interbay neighborhood to a new tunnel beneath the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

Motorists and pedestrians should expect detours between 23rd Avenue West and 24th Avenue West while crews with King County’s clean-water utility carry out work as part of the Ballard Siphon Replacement Project. Access to businesses near the closure will be maintained.

Temporary traffic revisions will include detours to West Jameson Street as well as parking restrictions on 23rd Avenue West and 27th Avenue West. People should expect increased truck traffic around the detour route during work hours, which are typically weekdays between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., though longer hours and weekend work are possible. Construction in the roadway is expected to be completed by early October. 
 
In service since 1935, King County’s Ballard Siphon is a wood-stave pipe that carries up to 60 million gallons of wastewater beneath the Ship Canal from north Seattle to the West Point Treatment Plant in Magnolia. The pipe has reached the end of its service life and needs to be replaced. 

When the project is complete at the end of 2013, the new infrastructure will increase wastewater system reliability while helping to control combined sewer overflows during heavy rain, which protects water quality in the Ship Canal and Salmon Bay.

King County has budgeted $54.3 million for the project and received about $41.85 million in low-interest loans from the Washington State Department of Ecology’s State Revolving Fund and the Washington State Public Works Trust Fund to cover project costs.

To learn more about the Ballard Siphon replacement, visit the project website at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Construction/Seattle/BallardSiphon.aspx.

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx

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People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.

Related information

Ballard Siphon replacement project

King County Wastewater Treatment