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Join a community discussion at North Beach CSO design workshop, May 12

Summary

An upcoming design workshop will offer community members an opportunity to preview and discuss landscaping and architectural options for King County’s North Beach Combined Sewer Overflow Control Project.

Story

An upcoming design workshop will offer community members an opportunity to preview and discuss landscaping and architectural options for King County’s North Beach Combined Sewer Overflow Control Project.

The workshop will take place on Saturday, May 12 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Carkeek Environmental Learning Center, 950 N.W. Carkeek Park Rd., Seattle.

In addition to design discussions, project staff will be available to answer questions about upcoming activities and ways people can stay informed and involved. 

CSOs occur during heavy rains in older parts of the city where pipes designed long ago to carry both sewage and stormwater reach capacity and overflow into water bodies, putting public health at risk.

To protect water quality and public health in Blue Ridge, King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division will build underground storage pipes in the public right-of-way in the area of Triton Drive Northwest and Northwest Blue Ridge Drive to store peak flows of stormwater and wastewater that would otherwise overflow into Puget Sound.

Additional information is available at on the project website at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Construction/Seattle/NBeachCSOStorage.aspx.

This release is also posted on the website for the Department of Natural Resources and Parks at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/dnrp.aspx

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx

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 People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.