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King County accepting applications for Lower Duwamish Green Grants through July 6

Summary

To support grassroots efforts to protect public health and the environment in communities surrounding the Lower Duwamish Waterway, King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) is making funding available for small-scale projects through its Green Grants program.

Story

To support grassroots efforts to protect public health and the environment in communities surrounding the Lower Duwamish Waterway, King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) is making funding available for small-scale projects through its Green Grants program.

Community groups, schools, businesses, tribes and local governments are invited to apply for grants to fund environmental projects that align with King County’s goals to control combined sewer overflows (CSO), improve air quality, curb new and ongoing sources of pollution in the Duwamish, and make improvements to water quality.

The total available grant funding in 2012 is $102,825 with a maximum award of $60,000. Grant applications are due by 5 p.m. on July 6.

Projects eligible for funding can include structural projects or educational programs. Examples of projects include:

  • Stormwater controls and best management practices that prevent contaminated stormwater from entering the river.
  • Enhancing shoreline habitat through plantings of native vegetation and softening shoreline armouring.
  • Outreach to local businesses and community to promote air and water quality goals.
  • Air quality improvements to sources of air pollution or projects that help solve air pollution.

The Lower Duwamish Waterway Green Grants Program is administered by King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division and the WRIA 9 Watershed Ecosystem Forum, which also oversees salmon recovery in the Green/Duwamish River.
The grants are part of a settlement agreement with Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) to resolve issues stemming from the West Point treatment plant’s raw sewage pump engines, which were discovered by King County staff in 2008 to be deviating from their permitted emissions limits. The County has been working in coordination with PSCAA to address the problem, which was linked to the engines’ performance criteria and did not result in harmful air pollution levels to the surrounding community.

For more information about WTD’s Green Grants, visit  http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Programs/GreenGrants.aspx or email GreenGrants@kingcounty.gov. People can also contact Karen Bergeron, WRIA 9 Grant Coordinator, at 206-296-8383 or 711 TTY.

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx

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People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.

Related information

Lower Duwamish Green Grants

King County Wastewater Treatment