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King County review of CSO control plan shows no significant environmental impact

Summary

July 2012 - The County’s Wastewater Treatment Division has issued a State Environmental Policy Act Determination of Non-Significance, or DNS, on a proposal for nine construction projects to reduce the number of combined sewer overflow discharges at 14 County-owned locations to no more than one time per year.The DNS documents are available for public review and open to comments through July 25.

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King County’s plan for addressing long-term combined sewer overflows would not have a significant negative impact on the environment, according to a review of the proposal released this week.

The County’s Wastewater Treatment Division has issued a State Environmental Policy Act Determination of Non-Significance, or DNS, on a proposal for nine construction projects to reduce the number of combined sewer overflow discharges at 14 County-owned locations to no more than one time per year.

The DNS documents are available for public review and open to comments through July 25.

“While this comment opportunity is focused on the overall plan for addressing combined sewer overflows, the public will have many opportunities to be involved in the siting and design of each of the individual projects outlined in the County’s long-term combined sewer overflow control plan,” said King County Wastewater Treatment Division Director Pam Elardo.

King County proposes projects to protect public health and the environment by reducing the volumes of untreated combined sanitary sewage and stormwater released to Puget Sound during heavy rains.

Projects could include storage and treatment facilities, conveyance system improvements, or green stormwater infrastructure and would be built between 2015 and 2030. The King County Council is scheduled to vote on the proposal in late September.

The SEPA process requires King County to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposal and to document and make public the findings. The DNS was issued after the agency determined that the proposal does not have probable significant adverse impacts on the environment and that an Environmental Impact Statement isn’t required under the conditions of state law.

In addition to King County’s public involvement process and project-level review under SEPA, individual projects would also still be subject to applicable permit requirements and approvals at the state, local and federal levels.

To review the SEPA documents for the proposed plan, please visit the Web at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Programs/EnvPlanning.aspx.

Documents will also be available to review at the following Seattle Public Library branches: Delridge, Douglass Truth, Fremont, Green Lake, Greenwood, Madrona-Sally Goodmark, Montlake, Northeast, South Park and University.

People can submit written comments on the SEPA determination by mail through July 25, 2012, to:

Wesley Sprague, Supervisor, Community Services and Environmental Planning
King County Wastewater Treatment Division
201 South Jackson Street, MS: KSC-NR-0505
Seattle, WA 98104-3855.

For information on how to submit comments electronically, contact Sue Meyer, Water Quality Planner, at 206-684-1171 or sue.meyer@kingcounty.gov.

People can find additional information about the recommended CSO control proposal on the Web at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/CSO/ProgramReview/Plan.aspx.

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx

Related information

King County Wastewater Treatment