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King County hosts upcoming meetings on South Magnolia CSO project, Jan. 21 & Feb 15

Summary

Two upcoming meetings will provide an opportunity for people to meet project staff and get updated information on King County’s South Magnolia Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Control Project.

Story

Two upcoming meetings will provide an opportunity for people to meet project staff and get updated information on King County’s South Magnolia Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Control Project.

A technical information session will take place on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Discovery Park Environmental Learning Center, 3801 Discovery Park Blvd., Seattle, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The project team will describe early geotechnical findings and other considerations that informed siting and design decisions, discuss construction methods, and explain how the new system will operate.

Project staff will host a community meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at the Magnolia Community Center, 2550 34th Avenue West, Seattle, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Discussion will focus on design for the underground storage tank at the West Yard, and description of construction activities that will be carried out in the Smith Cove Park/West Yard area.
CSOs occur during heavy rains in older parts of the city where pipes designed long ago to carry both sewage and stormwater reach capacity and overflow into water bodies, putting public health at risk.

To control CSOs and improve water quality in Puget Sound near Seattle’s Smith Cove Park, King County plans to build a 1.9 million gallon underground storage tank and new gravity sewer extending from 32nd Avenue West to the Port of Seattle’s Terminal 91 West Yard area. The storage facility will retain peak flows of stormwater and wastewater that could otherwise exceed system capacity during large storms. After storms pass, stored flows will be conveyed to West Point Treatment Plant in Discovery Park. The South Magnolia CSO Control Project is needed to meet current standards for CSO control and to help protect public health and Puget Sound water quality.

Additional information about the project is available at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Construction/Seattle/SMagnoliaCSOStorage.aspx. For questions or to arrange reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities at the meeting, please contact Monica van der Vieren at 206-263-7301 or email monica.vandervieren@kingcounty.gov.

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People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.

Related information:

King County's Combined Sewer Overflow Control Program

Wastewater Treatment Division

Central Puget Sound Watershed