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King County launches Loop at the NW Flower & Garden Show

Summary

King County’s clean-water utility today announced the launch of Loop, its new biosolids brand, at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show at the Washington State Convention Center, Feb. 8-12.

Story

King County’s clean-water utility today announced the launch of Loop, its new biosolids brand, at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show at the Washington State Convention Center, Feb. 8-12.

“Establishing a brand for our biosolids product gives us a great platform to communicate the benefits of the program and product to our customers and the people of this region,” said King County Wastewater Treatment Division Director Pam Elardo.

Produced by the King County’s regional wastewater treatment plants for nearly 40 years, Loop is a natural soil amendment and endlessly renewable resource that restores carbon and nutrients to the land for the good of plants, people and Puget Sound.

People are invited to stop by King County’s booth to meet soil experts and urban farmers who will share plant care tips as well as free samples of GroCo compost made with Loop.

Gardeners and commercial landscapers value the Loop in GroCo because it’s a source of micronutrients and macronutrients that build soil and boost plant growth. GroCo is weed-free and pathogen-free. It also aerates soil, retains moisture, and naturally helps plants grow bigger and better.

Besides building healthy soils, Loop reduces the need for synthetic fertilizers in gardens, commercial forestry, and agricultural operations.

Loop biosolids has a committed following of both users and supporters. “We’ve been composting Loop for more than 30 years. It makes a good black, rich, compost material,” said Curley Winebrenner, manager of GroCo Inc.

“As an urban farming collective, it only makes sense that we use an urban-derived compost. We know that using Loop not only helps us grow great crops, it’s also the right thing to do,” said Sean Conroe, founder of Seattle-based urban farming collective Alleycat Acres, which uses GroCo compost made with Loop to fertilize and amend their city farm sites.

Loop is also used in commercial forestry and agricultural operations through special arrangements with King County.

“Recycling Loop provides a multitude of benefits in the Mountains to Sound Greenway. Forest application of Loop in the Greenway enriches soil and promotes tree growth, helping to improve forest health on the edge of a major metropolitan area. By recycling close to home, we are saving energy and public dollars,” said Cynthia Welti, Executive Director of Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust.

To learn more about Loop and its ability to turn your dirt around for good, visit http://www.loopforyoursoil.com.

People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.