Skip to main content
Most King County offices will be closed on Monday, May 25, 2015, for Memorial Day.  
background image
King County logo
Skip to main content

Newsroom

Natural Resources and Parks
Public Affairs


Murray CSO project open house to focus on visible facility design concepts, Nov. 14

Summary

People seeking to comment on the preliminary design of visible facilities King County will build as part of the Murray Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Project are invited to a community open house.

Story

People seeking to comment on the preliminary design of visible facilities King County will build as part of the Murray Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Project are invited to a community open house.

Monday, Nov. 14 - 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Fauntleroy Church
9140 California Ave. S.W.
Seattle

King County’s Murray CSO Control Project entails building a 1-million gallon underground storage tank across from Lowman Beach Park to prevent stormwater and raw sewage from overflowing into Puget Sound during heavy rains.

During the meeting, project staff will discuss design themes and present conceptual drawings that were developed in response to the ideas community members shared at an all-day design workshop on Oct. 29. People are invited to review and comment on these early design plans, and to provide any additional feedback.

For additional information about the project, or to arrange reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities at the meeting, please contact Doug Marsano at 206-684-1235 or email doug.marsano@kingcounty.gov.

Note to editors and reporters: Visit the WTD Newsroom, a portal to information for the news media about the Wastewater Treatment Division, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Newsroom.aspx.

###

People enjoy clean water and a healthy environment because of King County's wastewater treatment program. The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health, the environment and the economy by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.5 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for nearly 50 years.

Related information

Puget Sound Beach CSO Control Projects

King County Wastewater Treatment