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Cedar River area to receive water quality enhancement funds

Summary

The $70,000 King County grant, focused on investing in better water quality by providing funding for organizations to take action in their communities, will assist in the removal of noxious weeds and other non-native plants infestations. This work will greatly improve water quality and increase the quantity of habitat available on the Cedar River for species such as the Chinook salmon

Story

Funds directed toward improving water quality on the Cedar River were awarded to Cedar River Stewardship-in-Action through the work of Metropolitan King County Councilmembers Larry Phillips and Reagan Dunn.

The $70,000 King County grant, focused on investing in better water quality by providing funding for organizations to take action in their communities, will assist in the removal of noxious weeds and other non-native plants infestations. This work will greatly improve water quality and increase the quantity of habitat available on the Cedar River for species such as the Chinook salmon.

“Decreasing river bank erosion and increasing fish habitat is good for land owners and good for wildlife,” said Councilmember Dunn. “I am always happy to help fund projects that result in a winning situation for both King County residents and the environment.”

“As a member of the Cedar River Council I am pleased that the 2015 Water Quality Improvement Project will help fund noxious weed removal programs that negatively impact our salmon populations – particularly Chinook salmon in the Cedar River,” said Cedar River Councilmember Frank Urabeck. “We continue to work to build strong stable fish runs in the Cedar and these grants will allow that work to continue.”

The Cedar River Stewardship-in-Action, a collaborative partnership between Forterra, Seattle Public Utilities, the City of Renton, and the King County Noxious Weed Control Program, works closely with private landowners to achieve their goals. The funds will allow the organization to restore habitat along the riverbanks while encouraging them to become permanent stewards of the Cedar River.

When adopted by the County in 1998, the Regional Wastewater Services Plan (RWSP) included a financial policy that specified the allowable use of up to one and one-half percent of the annual Wastewater Treatment Division’s operating budget for the purpose of “water quality improvement activities, programs and projects.” As part of the adopted 2015-2016 Biennial Budget, the Council approved funds for non-sewage treatment related water quality improvement activities, programs and projects.

The funds were available to governments, agencies and programs throughout King County. The projects were selected based on recommendations from the Metropolitan Pollution Abatement Advisory Committee (MWPAAC)—a panel that advises the King County Council and Executive on matters related to water pollution abatement – that projects benefit water quality and ratepayers within the Wastewater Treatment Division’s service area.
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